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Atenveldt Submissions (excerpted from the S.C.A. College of Arms' Letters of Acceptance and Return)

ATENVELDT REGISTRATIONS by the College of Arms, May 2003:

Adelyn la Souteresse. Name change from Eibhilin ni Mhaghnuis.

Her previous name, Eibhilin ni Mhaghnuis, is retained as an alternate name.

Adriana von Grimme. Name and device. Gules, on a cross ermine between four rabbits sejant argent a cross sable.

Submitted as Adriana von Grimm, all period examples found of this byname have an e on the end of the byname. Metron Ariston explains: While Bahlow in the place cited primarily notes examples where Grimm is a descriptive, he does cite two period examples with a prepositional form: Wulfard von Grimme from 1284 and Jorge von Grymme from 1491. However, both of these use a clear dative form so I would register this as Adriana von Grimme. We have changed this byname to von Grimme to match the documented examples.

Concerning the device, precedent indicates that fimbriating in a fur is not registerable heraldic style: "Ermine fimbriation is disallowed (LoAR of 3 Aug 86, p.17)..." (LoAR of October 1992, p. 26). Precedent also indicates that voiding, fimbriation, and "on an X an X" are considered equivalent designs for purposes of conflict, as is discussed more fully in the LoAR of June 2002.

Heraldic designs which are equivalent for purposes of conflict are not always equivalent for purposes of style: In this case the blazon can make a difference: while you cannot "blazon your way out of" a conflict, you can "blazon your way out of" a style problem. If not, all submissions of per chevron, three <X> would be returned because they could also be blazoned as a charged chapé. (LoAR February 2000). Therefore, we can consider whether this submission is a registerable depiction of an ermine cross charged with a sable cross, without being concerned about the fact that a cross sable fimbriated ermine is not registerable. This submission does have an acceptable depiction of a cross ermine charged with a cross sable. In this depiction, the portion of the ermine cross that shows is wide enough so that the ermine spots lying upon the cross are clearly identifiable: they are not too small to be identified, and the ermine spots and the tertiary cross do not overlap, and thus do not obscure each others' identifiability. This submission is therefore stylistically acceptable.

Anna Carye. Name.

This name does not conflict with opera singer Annie Louise Cary (1841-1921), even though she has her own entry in the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica. The "From Laurel: Beyond the Encyclopedia" section of the Cover Letter for the January 2003 LoAR explains: In order to bring the decision back within the College of Arms and to realign with our scope of protection, we are refining the process by which we decide which names to protect. Beginning with this letter, each name will be evaluated individually. The initial factor will continue to be an entry in a general-purpose encyclopedia. However, now we consider the prominence of this person (including when they lived and the length and contents of their encyclopedia entry) when determinining whether they are important enough to protect.

In accordence with this policy, since the singer Annie Louise Cary has an entry in the Encyclopedia Britannica, we considered whether or not she was important enough to protect. In this case, Annie Louise Cary is simply not well enough known among the general populace of the SCA to warrant protecting her name.

Aylwin Wyllowe. Name.

Björn Eiríksson. Name and device. Azure, a Thor's hammer argent within an annulet Or charged with eight mullets of eight points azure.

Listed on the LoI as Bjorn Erikson, the form listed this name as Bjorn Eriksson. The submitter requested authenticity for "Norse Viking" and allowed any changes. We have changed this name to the completely Old Norse form Björn Eiríksson in order to meet the submitter's request for authenticity.

Charles de Lacy. Name and device. Per bend sinister Or and vert, a Lacy knot counterchanged and in dexter chief a crescent vert.

Conall mac Magnusa. Name change from holding name Conall of Twin Moons and badge. (Fieldless) A shamrock sable charged with a triquetra Or.

Gunnar Silverbeard. Name and device. Argent, a sea-bull sable and a chief embattled gules.

The documentation provided in the LoI entry for this submission was inadequate. If this submission were judged solely on the evidence provided in the LoI, this name would have been returned for problems with both the given name and the byname. The LoI stated: The name is Old Norse and English. Gunnar is a masculine given name, "Viking Names found in the Land-námabók," Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~sfriedemann/names/landnamabok.htm <(http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~sfriedemann/names/landnamabok.htm>). The second element is a descriptive byname consistent with Norse practice of referring to an individual's physical characteristics; the submitter is not interested in using a translated form of the byname. The information provided in the LoI for the given name Gunnar does not match the information in the cited article. The statement that Silverbeard "is a descriptive byname consistent with Norse practice of referring to an individual's physical characteristics" provides no evidence that Silverbeard is a plausible byname in period.

Multiple members of the College went out of their way to provide the missing documentation as a courtesy to the submitter and we would like to thank them for their efforts. Regarding the given name, the correct title for Aryanhwy's article is "Viking Names found in the Landnámabók" and it is now located at http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/landnamabok.html. However, the name found there (and in Geirr Bassi) is Gunnarr, not Gunnar. Lind, E. H. Norsk-Islädska Dopnamn ock Fingerade Namn från Medeltiden (column 404 s.n. Gunnarr) dates Gunnar to 1374 and 1393, supporting Gunnar as a 14th C Norse/Icelandic form of this name. Sommelier found documentation to support Silverbeard as a plausible descriptive byname in English: R&W (sn Silverlock, p. 409) date John Silverloc to 1268 (from silver lock, silver hair) and John Silvertop (sn Silverside, p. 409) is dated 1478 with the meaning silver hair. They similarly list Peter Blacloke 1275 and Adam Blakelok 1332 probably from black-beard (sn Blacklock, p. 47) and William Whytlok is dated to 1285 (among others, sn Whitelock, p. 487). Given the R&W citations for black-beard (sn Blackbird, p. 46 with William Blacberd 1206, Thomas Blakeberd 1275) and white-beard (sn Whitbread, p. 486 with William Witberd 1221, Walter Wyteberd 1297), "silver-beard" is a plausible English descriptive epithet.

We would like to remind submissions heralds that inadequate documentation has been and will continue to be a reason for return.

Jehanne Chrestienne. Name and device. Gules estencely, an annulet Or.

Submitted as Jehanne Feu Chrestienne, Feu was submitted as a surname listed in Cateline de la Mor's article "Sixteenth Century Norman Names" (http://www.s_gabriel.org/names/cateline/norman16.html). Information has been found that Feu is used to mean 'deceased' in French records, not as a surname. Sommelier explains: I believe that Cateline's article is in error and the Feu is not a surname, but rather means "deceased". The two examples in Colm's "An Index to the Given Names in the 1292 Census of Paris" appear to use feu in this manner: Aalèz fame feu Jehan de Londres and Andrie fame feu Jehan de Beaumont. This is also the meaning I have seen in the genealogical research I have done, which covers the late 1600s through the mid-1800s. I don't know about period records, but post-period (1700s and 1800s) it is common to see illegitimate children simply identified as <name> fille/fils <mother' name> in civil registration records (birth, marriage, and death records). If the mother is dead, this becomes <name> fille/fils feu <mother' name>. Feu does not appear in Dauzat. Lacking evidence that Feu was used as a French surname in period, rather than as a notation meaning deceased, Feu is not registerable as a surname. Since the submitter allows dropping of Feu, we have dropped this element in order to register this name. As both Jehanne and Chrestienne are feminine given names, the name Jehanne Chrestienne is a given name with an unmarked matronymic byname. Based on the examples found by Sommelier, this name

would also be registerable as Jehanne fame feu Chrestien 'Jehanne wife of the deceased Chrestien'. Chrestien is found as a masculine given name in Colm's article cited by Sommelier above.

Jens Sveinsson. Name (see RETURNS for device).

The submitter requested authenticity for 1500 to 1600 Norse/Scandinavian. Lind, E. H. Norsk-Islädska Dopnamn ock Fingerade Namn från Medeltiden (column 995) dates Svein to 1456 as a given name, supporting Sveinsson as a late period Icelandic/Norse patronymic byname.

Kathleen MacChluarain the Pure. Badge. Quarterly vert and argent, in bend sinister two roses slipped and leaved bendwise sinister sable.

Konrad von Grimme. Name and device. Gules, on a cross erminois between four lions' heads erased Or a cross sable.

Submitted as Konrad von Grimm, all period examples found of this byname have an e on the end of the byname. Metron Ariston explains: While Bahlow in the place cited primarily notes examples where Grimm is a descriptive, he does cite two period examples with a prepositional form: Wulfard von Grimme from 1284 and Jorge von Grymme from 1491. However, both of these use a clear dative form so I would register this as Konrad von Grimme.

We have changed this byname to von Grimme to match the documented examples.

Concerning the device, precedent indicates that fimbriating in a fur is not registerable heraldic style: "Ermine fimbriation is disallowed (LoAR of 3 Aug 86, p.17)..." (LoAR of October 1992, p. 26). Precedent also indicates that voiding, fimbriation, and "on an X an X" are considered equivalent designs for purposes of conflict, as is discussed more fully in the LoAR of June 2002.

Heraldic designs which are equivalent for purposes of conflict are not always equivalent for purposes of style: In this case the blazon can make a difference: while you cannot "blazon your way out of" a conflict, you can "blazon your way out of" a style problem. If not, all submissions of per chevron, three <X> would be returned because they could also be blazoned as a charged chapé. (LoAR February 2000).

Therefore, we can consider whether this submission is a registerable depiction of an erminois cross charged with a sable cross, without being concerned about the fact that a cross sable fimbriated erminois is not registerable. This submission does have an acceptable depiction of a cross erminois charged with a cross sable. In this depiction, the portion of the erminois cross that shows is wide enough so that the ermine spots lying upon the cross are clearly identifiable: they are not too small to be identified, and the ermine spots and the tertiary cross do not overlap, and thus do not obscure each others' identifiability. This submission is therefore stylistically acceptable.

Nicholas Fletcher of Canterbury. Name.

Pauline the Apothecary. Name and device. Azure, a crescent argent and on a chief Or three oak leaves bendwise sinister vert.

Sorcha MacGregor. Name and device. Per chevron azure and Or, two Celtic crosses argent and a dragon passant gules.

Tighearain Blackwater. Badge. Sable, on a bend wavy between two crosses formy argent three suns in their splendor palewise sable.

Zhigmun' Broghammer. Device. Erminois, a Caucasian frauenadler displayed proper crined and feathered sable all within a bordure azure. This submission was pended from the October 2002 LoAR due to an incorrect blazon.

ATENVELDT RETURNS by the College of Arms, May 2003:

Catherine Diana de Chambéry. Badge. (Fieldless) A mullet of four points elongated to base quarterly argent and azure.

Conflict with Gerhard Helmbrecht von Offenbach, (Fieldless) A compass star quarterly argent and azure, registered in January 2003. There is one CD for fieldnessness. There is no difference between a mullet of four points and a compass star per the LoAR of January 2001: "As neither a compass star nor a mullet of four points are period charges, and they differ only by the addition of the lesser points, there is not a CD between a mullet of four points and a compass star." There is also no difference for the slight artistic variant in elongating the bottom point of a mullet.

Note that this armory is eligible for the letter of permission to conflict against the badge of Eleanor Leonard, (Tinctureless) A mullet of four points distilling a goutte, described in the cover letter of the January 2002 LoAR. It is eligible because the mullet is divided into more than one tincture.

Ian Cradoc. Device change. Per fess azure and sable, three decrescents Or and a turnpike argent.

The turnpike, or turnstyle, in this submission would be the defining registration of this charge in SCA heraldry. Defining instances of charges require slightly higher standards of documentation than registrations of previously registered charges. This policy has been upheld consistently for over ten years but one of the clearest statements of the policy is in the LoAR of August 1995:

A registration of this submission would apparently be the first, and therefore defining, instance of such a charge. Especially in the case of charges not registered previously, the College requires documentation that the charge (a) has been used in period armory or (b) is compatible with similar charges in period armory, and (c) has a standardized depiction which would make reproducability [sic] from the blazon possible. We need such documentation here.

This submission was accompanied by a single piece of documentation from Parker's A Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry. This book does not clearly date the charge as having been used in period armory. The only date provided in Parker is associated with the crest of Skipworth, but appears to be the date of the founding of the baronetcy rather than the date of the crest. We consulted Fairbairn's Crests, but that volume did not help resolve the date of that particular crest. No evidence was presented by the submitting kingdom, and none was found by the College or Laurel staff, for use of a turnpike in period heraldry.

If a turnpike is a period artifact, it would probably be "compatible with similar charges in period armory" such as portcullises and doors However, no evidence was presented describing a period turnpike. Nor was documentation presented showing that a turnpike "has a standardized depiction which would make reproducability [sic] from the blazon possible." The submission must therefore be returned until such time as the turnpike may be documented appropriately for a defining instance of the charge.

Jens Sveinsson. Device. Argent, a merman proper crined sable maintaining in his sinister hand an open book argent fimbriated gules all within a bordure engrailed vert semy of escallops argent.

The engrailings on the bordure are too numerous and too shallow for easy identifiability: this could just as easily appear to be indented from any distance. This must be returned per RfS VIII.3, which states in part, "Identifiable elements may be rendered unidentifiable by significant reduction in size." In addition, the maintained book may not be fimbriated. RfS VIII.3 states, in part, "Voiding and fimbriation may only be used with simple geometric charges placed in the center of the design." An open book is not a simple geometric charge and it is not in the center of the field in this device. Note that the book was blazoned on the Letter of Intent as an open book argent bound gules, but that blazon would not necessarily recreate the fact that the binding fimbriates the book around all of its edges. The escallops on the bordure would be more identifiable if they were larger and if there were fewer of them.

Tearlach McIntosh. Name.

This name conflicts with Charles Macintosh (1766-1843), the Scottish chemist and inventor who invented waterproofed fabric and who has his own entry in the online version of the 1911 Encyclopedia Britannica. It is from his name that a raincoat is often called a "macintosh" throughout much of the English-speaking world. The names Tearlach (which is pronounced approximately "TCHAHR-l@", where @ represents a schwa sound) and Charles have been equated over time due to their similarity in sound. It is this similarity in sound which is the cause for this conflict.

Sommelier notes: Black (sn Tearlach, p. 764) notes "Teàrlach is the Gaelic name with which Charles has been equated. There is no co[nn]ection between the two names, it being simply a case of adopting a name like or nearly like in sound to the Gaelic." Black also notes "In Irish as a forename it has been Anglicized Turlough and Terence (!)."

Black (p. 465 s.n. MacCarlich) shows that the association of these names and so similarity in their pronunciation, dates to period in Scots (a language closely related to English), when he states that "Tarlocht M'Ene V'Carlych, a witness in 1573, appears again in the same year as Charles M'Ane V'Tarlych and as Therlycht M'Ain W'Therlycht". Therefore, because of the similarity in sound between the names Charles and Tearlach, these names conflict.

The College noted other information regarding the given name Tearlach that the submitter may wish to consider when resubmitting this name.

Tearlachis a Modern Gaelic (c. 1700 to present) form of this name. Lacking evidence that it was used in Gaelic in period, it is not registerable. The Middle Gaelic (c. 900 to c. 1200) form of this name is Tairdelbach. The Early Modern Gaelic (c. 1200 to c. 1700) form of this name is Toirdhealbhach. This name appears in Scots (as noted in Black, p. 465 s.n. MacCarlich, cited above) as Tarlocht and Therlycht in 1573.

Anglicized Irish forms of this name are found in indentures listed in footnotes in John O'Donovan, ed., Annals of Ireland, by the Four Masters, vol. 5. These indentures date the given name forms Tirlagh to 1578 (pp. 1710-1712), Tirlogh and Tirloghe to 1576 (pp. 1690-1691), Tirrelage to 1570 (pp. 1651-1652), and Tirreloghe to 1570 (pp. 1649-1650).


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