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Atenveldt Submissions (excerpted from the S.C.A. College of Arms' Letters of Acceptance and Return)

ATENVELDT REGISTRATIONS by the College of Arms, February 2003:

Ailleann inghean Roibeirt Fhrancaigh. Name change from holding name MariAnn of Atenveldt.

Submitted as Ailleann inghean Riobeirt Fhrancaigh, no documentation was presented and none was found that Riobeirt is a plausible variant of the documented Roibeirt. We have changed this name to use the documented form Roibeirt in order to register this name.

Alaric Grümper. Device. Argent, on a bend wavy gules between a two-wheeled cart and a warhammer reversed proper a chain thoughout argent.

Alessandro of Tir Ysgithr. Holding name and device (see RETURNS for name). Azure, a bull rampant and a chief indented argent.

Submitted under the name Alessandro delle Alpi.

Damian Blackthorne of the Sea. Name change from holding name Damian of Ered Sûl.

Edric Longfellow. Name and device. Per pale gules and azure, two stalks of barley in saltire within a bordure Or.

Submitted as Eadric Longfellow, the submitter requested authenticity for an unspecified language/culture (presumably English based on the documentation) and allowed any changes. As submitted, this name combines an Old English given name with a Middle English byname dated only to 1475 and later. Combining Old English and Middle English in a single name is a weirdness because of the dramatic linguistic and orthographic differences between the two languages. A modern English speaker can usually read unmodernized versions of plays by Shakespeare with few difficulties. Many can read unmodernized versions of works by Chaucer, though with more difficulty. If you hand them a copy of Beowulf that is not modernized (or translated), very few will be able to make heads or tails of it. These differences are the basis for the weirdness for using Old English and Middle English in the same name.

The weirdness for a temporal disparity of greater than 300 years is a different issue from the lingual mix of Old English and Middle English. As explained recently: Not only did languages change over time, the pool of names that were in use changed over time as well. Therefore, when one element in a name is only dated early and another is only dated late, it is unlikely that these two elements would have been appeared in the same name. The greater the temporal disparity, the less likely these name elements would have appeared together. RfS III.1 states in part that "Each name as a whole should be compatible with the culture of a single time and place." Currently, there is no weirdness for elements that are dated within 300 years of one another, but there is a weirdness for elements dated between 300 and 1000 years apart. Elements that are dated more than 1000 years apart are not registerable, due to the significant temporal disparity. [Sáerlaith an Einigh, November 2002 LoAR, A-Æthelmearc]

Therefore, the submitted form of this name had two weirdnesses; one for the lingual mix of Old English and Middle English, and a second for a temporal disparity of greater than 300 years. As the submitter indicated that the sound of the name was most important to him, we have changed the given name to the form Edric, which is dated to the 13th C in Talan Gwynek's article "Men's Given Names from Early 13th Century England" (http://www.s_gabriel.org/names/talan/eng13/eng13m.html), to change this name to a completely Middle English form in order to register this name.

Eric Haukeseye. Name and device. Per bend sable and gules, a bow bendwise string to base and a hawk's head erased Or.

Eric was submitted under the Legal Name Allowance. However, no documentation (such as a photocopy of a driver's license) was provided to support Eric as the submitter's legal given name. Lacking such evidence, Eric is not registerable via the Legal Name Allowance. Siren found that Sveriges Medeltida Personnamn (vol. 5, column 735, s.n. Erik) shows several examples of Eric as a Swedish masculine given name, including Eric Stook dated to 1460. Therefore, this submission is registerable as a Swedish given name with an English byname.

Geneviève de Saint-Cirq-Lapopie. Device. Purpure, a sun Or eclipsed by a moon in her plenitude azure and on a chief Or three compass stars azure.

It is acceptable for charges on charges to be a close variant of charges on the field. This sort of design does not run afoul of the design strictures colloquially known as the "sword and dagger" problem: [...on a chevron between three hearts argent three hearts sable] There is no problem with having the same type of charge as both secondaries and tertiaries. Submissions are only returned if the same type of charge is used as primary and secondary charges. (LoAR September 1999.)

Gerold the Bald. Device. Per fess gules and sable, a fess embattled-counterembattled and in base an eagle's head erased argent.

Hákon Þorgeirsson. Name and device. Azure, a chevron enarched within and conjoined at the point to a chevron argent between a drakkar and a Thor's hammer Or.

Listed on the LoI as Haakon Thorgiersson, the form showed the submitted name as Haakon Þorgeirsson. The submitter requested authenticity for Icelandic/Norse and allowed minor changes. The only documentation presented for the spelling Haakon was a list of kings of Norway that had been assembled for this submission. Included in the listing for each king was an abbreviation indicating source(s) for the reference. However, a bibliography was provided for only one of the abbreviations, and that source was a modern genealogical website. Additionally, no photocopies were provided for any of these sources. As none of them are included in the list provided in the Administrative Handbook "Appendix H - Books That Do Not Require Photocopies to Laurel", this documentation is not complete and so does not support the submitted name. Lacking evidence that Haakon is a period form, it is not registerable. Geirr Bassi (p. 11) lists the form of this name as Hákon. Therefore, we have changed this name to Hákon Þorgeirsson in order to register this name and to meet the submitter's request for authenticity.

The central conjunction of chevrons was blazoned on the Letter of Intent as a chevron inarched. A standard SCA chevron enarched has each arm embowed outwards (curved in the opposite direction from the arms of a chevron ployé). The SCA chevron enarched is an artistic variant of a standard chevron deriving from attempts to show the curvature of a shield. The combination of chevrons in this submission is found in Legh's 1591 Accedens of Armory, where the combination is blazoned as a chevron enarched. Parker, in his Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, blazons this combination as a chevron inarched. To avoid confusion with the already established SCA definition of a chevron enarched we have blazoned this device using standard SCA blazon terms. If there is any question about what this conjunction of chevrons looks like, we direct the reader to Parker's Glossary under chevron inarched. The book may be found in libraries and there is an on-line version at http://www002.upp.so-net.ne.jp/saitou/parker/jpglossc.htm#Chevron.

Lori of Mons Tonitrus. Holding name and device (see RETURNS for name). Vert, a chevron enarched within and conjoined at the point to a chevron argent between two fleurs-de-lys and a Thor's hammer Or.

The central conjunction of chevrons was blazoned on the Letter of Intent as a chevron inarched. A standard SCA chevron enarched has each arm embowed outwards (curved in the opposite direction from the arms of a chevron ployé). The SCA chevron enarched is an artistic variant of a standard chevron deriving from attempts to show the curvature of a shield. The combination of chevrons in this submission is found in Legh's 1591 Accedens of Armory, where the combination is blazoned as a chevron enarched. Parker, in his Glossary of Terms used in Heraldry, blazons this combination as a chevron inarched. To avoid confusion with the already established SCA definition of a chevron enarched we have blazoned this device using standard SCA blazon terms. If there is any question about what this conjunction of chevrons looks like, we direct the reader to Parker's Glossary under chevron inarched. The book may be found in libraries and there is an on-line version at http://www002.upp.so-net.ne.jp/saitou/parker/jpglossc.htm#Chevron. Submitted under the name Alizaunde Thorgeirrson.

Ragnarr Gunnarsson. Name.

Listed on the LoI as Ragnar Gunnarsson, both the submission form and the submitted documentation list the given name as Ragnarr. We have made this correction.

Romanus Castelyn. Name.

Rurik Levushka Ul'ianov. Device. Ermine, a lion dormant contourny gules and a bordure azure.

Scott of Tir Ysgithr. Holding name (see RETURNS for name).

Submitted under the name Ulfgar Thegnson.

Scott of Tir Ysgithr and Ragnarr Gunnarsson. Joint badge. Per bend sinister wavy argent and azure, two bearded axes in saltire sable and three Thor's hammers Or.

Steffan von Hessen. Device. Or goutty de sang, a pall inverted engrailed between two eagles displayed heads to sinister sable and a rose gules.

Suzanne du Soleil. Device. Per chevron inverted argent and sable, a sun in its splendor sable eclipsed Or and a lily argent.

Þóra Sværradóttir. Name and device. Per chevron azure and purpure, two Thor's hammers and a wolf sejant ululant argent.

Listed on the LoI as Tóra Sværradottir, the submission form shows Tóra Svaerradottir. The submitter requested authenticity for 10th C Norse and allowed minor changes. We have modified this name to a consistently Old Norse form in order to meet the submitter's request for authenticity.

Wolf Strongarm. Name (see RETURNS for device).

ATENVELDT RETURNS by the College of Arms, February 2003:

Alessandro delle Alpi. Name.

The submitter requested authenticity for 15th to 16th C Northern Italy and allowed no changes. The only documentation provided for the byname delle Alpi, intended to mean 'of the Alps', was from a modern Italian dictionary. This gives no indication whether such a byname would have been used in Italian in period. Several commenters found that Fucilla (p. 100) stated: Unless it refers to a place name Alpe, dall'Alpi is difficult to explain since the vast mountain system of the Alps is too big and indefinite to have produced a cognomen. Lacking evidence that any form of delle Alpi is a plausible Italian byname in period, it is not registerable. His armory has been registered under the holding name Alessandro of Tir Ysgithr.

Alizaunde Thorgeirrson. Name.

No documenation was presented and none was found to support Alizaunde as a plausible name in period. Lacking such evidence, Alizaunde is not registerable. Regarding Thorgeirrson, the LoI stated that, "The submitter is using this as a marriage name, as Haakon Thorgeirrson is her legal husband." There are two problems with this name. First, no documentation was presented for this relationship other than this statement in the LoI. Lacking such evidence, the submission is not eligible for the Grandfather Clause. (See the Cover Letter for the October 2002 LoAR "Clarification of the Grandfather Clause" for more details.) Were documentation provided as required for the Grandfather Clause, her husband's Norse patronymic byname would still not be registerable with a feminine given name. Precedent states: As is explained in the 22 February 1993 Cover Letter, we have extended the principle in two ways. First, we allow the original submitter to register further instances of the problematic element provided that they introduce no new violations of the rules; and secondly, we extend the allowance to the original submitter's nearest kin. [Roxanne Blackfeather, December 1995 LoAR, R-East] Throughout period, bynames were literal in Scandinavia. Metron Ariston explains: [This byname] would not in period have been used as to indicate the wife of someone whose patronymic was Þorgeirsson as married women in Scandinavia retained their own patronymics as they do to this day in Iceland. And, if you changed it to the period Þorgeirsdóttir, you would be implying she was her husband's sister, which I suspect she does not want to be. (Also note that the heading on Haakon'[s] name submission has the patronymic as Thorgiersson, not the form used here.) Therefore, a name combining any form of Thorgeirrson with a feminine given name is grammatically incorrect and is not registerable. Further, because her husband's name does not have this violation, her name submission introduces a new violation of the rules as prohibited in the precedent cited above. Her armory has been registered under the holding name Lori of Mons Tonitrus.

Ulfgar Thegnson. Name.

No documentation was presented and none was found to support Ulfgar as a plausible Norse given name in period. It is possible that Ulfgar may be a plausible variant of the Old English name Wulfgær, but the plausibility of such a variation would need to be examined. Searle (p. 507) includes an entry that lists both the forms Wulfgar and Ulgar. Many of the second forms in Searle's headers are Latin forms of the names in question and the loss of the f may (or may not) be an aspect of the Latin form.

The byname Thegnson is presumptuous. As noted by Black Pillar: Thegn is on the Alternate Titles List, as the Old English equivalent of both "Viscount" and "Baron." This puts the name afoul of RfS. VI.1, Names Claiming Rank, which states, "Names containing titles, territorial claims, or allusions to rank are considered presumptuous." This name is being returned for using a form of Thain as a byname, which has previously been prohibited: [Lucius Thayne] A thane (or thegn) was a free retainer in pre-Conquest England, and in Scotland up to the 15th Century; the term denotes a member of territorial nobility corresponding to the Norman baron or knight. The title was one step below the eorl, and might be either earned or inherited. In the SCA, the term is used as the Old English equivalent of "baron", and is therefore reserved. Old English usage puts the title after the name: Ælfred cyning, Leofric eorl, Lyfing arcebisceop. The submitted name is thus exactly in the form that would have been used by a period thane. That fact, along with the Society use of the title, and its hereditary nature in period, outweighs the documented use of Thane, Thaine as a surname later in period. It must therefore be returned as presumptuous. (OED, under the entries for earl, king and thane; '93 E.Brit., vol.11, p.672; Reaney DBS II, pp.112, 345). (Lucius Thayne, July, 1993, pg. 15) [Chromán Thein, 11/01, R-Trimaris] His armory has been registered under the holding name Scott of Tir Ysgithr.

Wolf Strongarm. Device. Per pale sable and Or, in chief a death's head counterchanged.

The mini-emblazon on the Letter of Intent showed a large death's head clearly centered on the shield. However, this submission shows a smaller and differently drawn death's head placed in chief. The College was not able to comment on the submission as submitted, as they were not provided with an accurate mini-emblazon. The Cover Letter for the April 2002 LoAR stated: In the last few months, there have been cases where the mini-emblazon included with the Letter of Intent did not accurately represent the emblazon on the submission form. If the emblazon does not match the form, the CoA cannot produce useful commentary, which in turn does not allow a decision on that item. The CoA has enough to review without commenting on the "wrong" item. A mismatch between the LoI emblazon and what is on the submission form can be reason for administrative return. If you produce LoIs, please double-check that the mini-emblazons on your letters are a good representation of the emblazons on the submission forms." Photoreduction is recommended over redrawing. Scanning can be used with care. Many complaints have been received about mini-emblazons which were produced by scanning at inappropriate settings, rendering elements of the armory invisible or otherwise unidentifiable.

This submission must therefore be returned.


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