only search Aten Submissions
Home Page
Submission Forms
Search A&O
Letters of Presentation (LoP)
Letters of Intent (LoI)
Quick Status
Recent Actions
Heraldic References
Heraldic Art Bits
The Standards for Evaluation of Names and Armory:
The Rules for Submissions
Kingdom of Atenveldt Home Page

Kingdom of Atenveldt
Heraldic Submissions Page

(administered by the Brickbat Herald)

ATENVELDT COLLEGE OF HERALDS

Letter of Intent

20 July 2016, A.S. LI



Unto Andrewe Laurel; Lillia Pelican; Brunissende Wreath; and the commenting Members of the College of Arms,

Greetings from Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, Brickbat Herald and Parhelium Herald for the Kingdom of Atenveldt!



The Atenveldt College of Heralds requests the consideration and registration of the following names and armory with the College of Arms.

Unless specifically stated, the client will accept any spelling and grammar corrections; all assistance is appreciated.


1. Ælfgyfe Æthelwulfesdohtor: NAME CHANGE from Holding Name Michelle of Twin Moons

Originally submitted as Oriande Æthelwulfesdohter, the name was returned by Laurel January 2016 and a holding name assigned for the following reasons: “The literary name Oriande is only found as the name of a non-human character, a fairy. Although we have a pattern of borrowing of literary names in French, the pattern of using the names of fairies was not documented, so we are not able to register this name as submitted.

“The literary mistress of Amadis de Gaul cited in the Letter of Intent is named Oriane or Oriana in period documents. However, this instance is an Iberian name, which cannot be combined with the late 9th century Anglo-Saxon byname. Oriane and Oriana are also English given names from 1629 and 1578, respectively (FamilySearch Historical Records), and Oriana is a nickname used to refer to Queen Elizabeth I. It is found, for example, in the title of Thomas Morley's The Triumphs of Oriana, a book of madrigals from 1601. However, the temporal gaps between these and the byname would be greater than 500 years. Therefore, we are unable to change the given name to Oriane or Oriana and must return this name.”
Ælfgyfe is a female Anglo-Saxon given name dated to 1018 and found in “Anglo-Saxon Women's Names from Royal Charters,” Marieke van de Dal (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/marieke/anglosaxonfem/).

The PASE data base shows many examples of Æthelwulf as a male given name, http://www.pase.ac.uk/pdb?dosp=VIEW_RECORDS&st=PERSON_NAME&value=15&level=1&lbl=%C3%86thelwulf. The suffix forms a patronymic from it.

The client desires a female name and is most interested in the spelling and language and/or culture of the name (9th-11th C Anglo-Saxon).


2. Æsa Væna: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, January 2016
Per pale purpure and argent, two domestic cats sejant respectant counterchanged argent and sable, on a chief vert an ivy vine Or.

The name was registered January 2016.

The original device was returned for contrast issues by Laurel: “Blazoned on the Letter of Intent as Per pale purpure and argent, two domestic cats sejant respectant argent and sable, on a chief vert an ivy vine Or, the vine is actually sable with Or leaves and thus has insufficient contrast with the vert chief.” A completely Or vine is now used.


3. Aldontza Nafarra: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, July 2012

Argent, three falcons striking contourny in annulo vert.


The name was registered July 2012.


The original submission, Argent, in pall three falcons striking, claws to center, vert., was returned “for not being reliably blazonable, which is a violation of section VII.7.b of the Rules for Submissions, and section A1C of the Standards for Evaluation, both of which require an emblazon to be describable in heraldic terms. Long-standing precedent does not allow animate charges to be inverted except when they are part of a standard arrangement such as in annulo. The posture and orientation of the birds here is difficult to adequately describe, and so this must be returned.” The wings were in a “V” shape over the backs of the birds, which doesn't follow a standard heraldic orientation of wings (not rising, not stooping, not arranged so there is a wing on either side of a bird's body). This resolves that issue. The blazon is borrowed in part from the registered armory of Már í Miklagarði: Quarterly gules and argent, four ravens in annulo counterchanged.


4. Argouanagus of Scythia: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, on a chevron between two chess knights and a wolf's head cabossed sable a plate.


Argounanagus is a Scythian male given name found in “Greek Names with Scytho-Sarmatian Roots,” Ursula Georges (http://yarntheory.net/ursulageorges/names/iranianroots.html); it also has eight entries in Volume 4 of the LGPN (http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/). The client is willing to accept the spelling of the given name suggested by Jennifer Smith (transliterated as -os rather than -us), and as it appears on other portions of his documentation.

Tymes the Scythian was registered February 2007 without comment; his documentation notes that Herodotus describes this people (Herodotus VII.64).

The client wants a male name and it most interested in the language/culture of the name (Scythian); he will not accept Major Changes to the name.


5. Brígiða Finnvarðardóttir: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse.

Brígiða is a female given name in “The Old Norse Name,” Geirr Bassi Haralsson, p. 8.

Finnvarðr is a male given name, ibid, p. 9. Gunnvor Orle writes: “Certain men's names form their genitive in -ar. Most of these are names ending in -dr, but others are included: ...-varðr... (http://www.vikinganswerlady.com/ONNames.shtml). Hence, the submitter's hunch is correct. The client desires a female name and is most interested in the language and/or culture of the name (Old West Norse).


6. Conrad Bombast von Trittenheim: NEW DEVICE CHANGE

Argent, a moth and on a chief sable four nails argent.


The name was registered June 2014.

In the event that this submission is registered, the client wishes his current device, Argent, a bat-winged manticore segreant gules, headed and winged sable. (registered 6/2013), kept as a badge.

Although the abdomen of the moth is marked sable and argent, I believe there's enough contrast between the field and the moth to keep it very identifiable (it may help to blazon it as “...sable, marked argent...”). The charges in chief most closely resemble tilers' nails, according to the Pictorial Dictionary.


7. Duncan the Sinister: NEW NAME and DEVICE:

Argent, a badger rampant contourny regardant proper, a chief embattled sable.


Duncan can be documented as a given name: Duncan Ademe married in November 1572 in Aberdeen, Scotland, https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/XTJK-8P5.

In registering Aron Sinister, Siren Herald said: “I found a 1457 citation of a French <Colin Senestre>. It's from the Comptes du domaine de la ville de Paris, publiés par les soins du Service des travaux historiques de la ville de Paris, edited by Alexandre Vidier (Paris, Impr. nationale, 1948-). This is from the 1457-8 Comptes. I'd say that this together with the English citation Jeanne Marie mentions should be enough to allow <Senestre>. The MED (s.n. senestre) gives this as a header form, but also dates <sinister> to 1474 (in the deceitful sense) and dates <sinistre> and <senester> to a. 1500 in the "left" sense. This should be enough to allow the spelling <sinister>.”

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name.


The badger could also be blazoned as sable, marked argent, which might be a little clearer to an individual who isn't sure of the proper coloration of the animal.


8. Duncan the Sinister: NEW BADGE

Argent, a badger's head erased sable, marked argent , within six pellets in annulo.


9. Elena Maria Suberria: NAME RESUBMISSION from Laurel, January 2016

The original name submission Elena Maria de Suberria, was returned because documentation supported Suberria, but not the preposition; she allowed no Major Changes to the name, so the preposition couldn't be dropped and the submissions had to be returned.

Elena is a female given name found in “Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century: Women's Names in Alphabetical Order," Juliana de Luna, http://heraldry.sca.org/names/isabella/WomensGivenAlpha.html.
Maria is found as a given name and Suberria, “new-hearth,” is a 13th-14th byname, both found in “Basque Feminine Names,” Aryanhwy merch Catmael, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/spanish/basque.html.
Laurel notes that the pattern of using Basque elements with Castilian name construction is supported by the article "Basque Onomastics of the Eighth to Sixteenth Centuries" by Karen Larsdatter (http://www.larsdatter.com/basque/index.htm).
The client desires a female name and is most interested in the language/culture of the name.


10. Elezabeth Dayseye: NEW DEVICE
Purpure, semy of daisies Of, a unicorn counchant contourny and on a chief argent an arrow fesswise to sinister azure.


The name appears in the 21 May 2016 Atenveldt Letter of Intent.


11. Elise la Galante: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Or, a female archer statant drawing to sinister vert, and on a chief embattle azure a demi-sun issuant from chief Or.
Elise is a female given name found in “Index of Names in the 1582 Subsidy Roll of London,”Sara L. Uckelman, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/english/engfemlondon1582.html. Galant is a surname dated to 1326 in England (Reaney and Wilson, 3rd ed., p. 182 s.n. Gallant), and it also comes from the Old French Galand, Galant. It is found in “French Surnames from Paris, 1421, 1423 & 1438,” Aryanhwy merch Catmael, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/paris1423surnames.html. (It is also the client's legal surname.) The client has made it more distinctly feminine by adding the terminal -e and the feminine article la. While galante does exist (http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/galante) as a noun, it seems to have the definition of a loose woman.

The client desires a female name and is most interested in the spelling of the name. She wishes is to be authentic for the time and language/culture (12th-14th C. French).


12. Emeludt von Zerssen: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, a chevron rompu azure between two peacocks close respectant proper and a seeblatt azure.


Emeludt is a female given name found in “15th-Century German Women's Names,” Talan Gwynek, http://heraldry.sca.org/names/germ15f.html. The byname can be dated as a wedding day to 20 October 1624 for Maria Zerßen (she was widowed at the time and remarrying; the name of her deceased husband was Zerßen) at Evangelische Kirche Nussdorf, Bayern, Germany, Batch M99755-1, https://familysearch.org/search/record/results?count=20&query=%2Bsurname%3AZerssen%20%2Bbirth_place%3AGermany~%20%2Bbirth_year%3A1400-1650~.

Several von Zerssen bynames that predate 1650 are found https://familysearch.org/search/collection/igi/results?count=20&query=%2Bsurname%3A%22von%20Zerssen%22~%20%2Bany_place%3AGermany~%20%2Bany_year%3A1400-1650~%20%2Bsubcollection_id%3A5&igi=2. The client desires a female name, and is most interested in the language/culture of the name (German). She would like it authentic for language/culture, German 14th-15th C. (I hope this is the correct special character for the double -s-.)


There are examples of both proper peacock feathers (lots of these) and that of the whole bird registered with the College of Arms: Ceallach O'Shea, Or, a peacock in its pride proper and on a base vert two double-pointed knitting needles in saltire Or., was registered Decmeber 2012; and Brianna Je Nell Aislynn of Blue Shadows: (Fieldless) Two peacocks addorsed conjoined proper., was registered December 2009.


13. Eoda Blauschild: NEW NAME CHANGE from Angelica Blauschild

Eoda is a male given name. It is found in PASE as the name of a priest who died before 717 (l vii-e viii); a priest known to Theodore I (l vii-e viii); and a moneyer associated with the Wallingford mint for Aethelred 32 (1 x), http://www.pase.ac.uk/index.html.

As to the byname Blauschild: The client's currently-registered name was registered January 1998. SENA states PN.1 Person Names Content g. The Grandfather Clause: “In a new personal name submission, an individual may use name phrases already register to them, even it that name phrase would no long be allowed under the current rules.” Also in SENA PN.2. With 2. Culturally Mixed Names: “d. A name which includes name phrases documented under the legal name allowance, the grandfather clause, or the branch name allowance follows special rules. These name phrases are treated as neutral in language and time. Such name phrases may be combined with name phrases from a single regional naming group dated to within 500 years of one another. They may not be combined with name phrases from two or more regional naming groups. If a name phrase can also be documented as either an attested or constructed name, it may be treated in whichever way is more favorable for registration.

“In addition, if a grandfathered name phrase was found in a registered name that combined languages from two or more regional naming groups, the new submission may combine those same regional naming groups. If this allowance is used, then no new regional naming group may be added.”

The client doesn't care about the gender of the name and is more interested in the spelling of the name; she will not accept Major Changes to the name. She wishes to maintain the old name as an alternate.


14. Felipe Mendo de Eslava del Montoya: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per bend sinister argent and Or, a boar statant gules and a lupine azure, slipped and leaved vert.


Felipe is a male given name found in “Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century,” Juliana de Luna (https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/MensGivenAlpha.html).

Mendo is a male given name found in the same source.

Fernán González de Eslava (1542-1601) was a Spanish poet and dramatist, born in Spain (perhaps Toledo) and settled in Mexico. It appears that he seems to have written material of a religious nature.

De Montoya is a locative found in Juliana's work, above.

Per SENA Appendix A, Catalan locatives may exist as “del Y,” and per SENA Appendix C, late period Spanish and Catalan name elements can be combined. The client would prefer the phrase as “del Montoya,” but he will change it in order for the name to be registered.

The client desires a male name and it most interested in the sound of the name; he will not accept Major Changes to the name (aside from the Catalan mentioned above).


15. Finnvarðr Snæbiarnarson: NEW DEVICE

Per bend vert and argent, a boar's head erased and a quiver with three arrows bendwise counterchanged.


The name was registered August 2014.


Harrier Herald comments: From the May 2012 Cover Letter: "In short, if the charges in a single charge group do not have comparable postures, they are not in violation of the "identical postures/orientations" part of the rule. The charge group as a whole must still be in a standard arrangement." This precedent is not overturned by the January 2016 Cover Letter. Further, the head of a beast is a "compact" charge, while a quiver is a "long skinny" charge, so they are not comparable. There is no unity issue here.


16. Gaius Clodius Pugnax: NEW NAME

Gaius is one of the few Latin praenomen seen (http://www.forumromanum.org/life/johnston_2.html#41), hence its wide use.
Clodius is a nomen (http://www.therthdimension.org/AncientRome/RomanNaming/romannaming.htm); it appears to be a variant of the more commonly seen patrician gens Claudius. During the Late Republic, the spelling Clodius is most prominently associated with Publius Clodius Pulcher (93 BC-52 BC), a popularist politician who gave up his patrician status through adoption in order to qualify for the office of tribune of the plebs. He was a champion of the urban plebs, supporting free grain for the poor and the right of association in guilds (collegia); because of this individual's ideology, Clodius has often been taken as a more "plebeian" spelling and a gesture of political solidarity (https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Clodius; http://www.britannica.com/biography/Publius-Clodius-Pulcher).

Pugnax is found as a cognomen in two sources, A Study of the Cognomina of Soldiers in the Roman Legions By Lindley Richard Dean https://books.google.com/books?id=3AErAAAAYAAJ&pg=PA128&lpg=PA128&dq=pugnax+cognomen&source=bl&ots=e 2zXRHCVWS&sig=tMJsJF1hZNIukGJTco4gC50UdAo&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwivv5SFk-fMAhWypYMKHV7cCFsQ6AEIHTAA# v=onepage&q=pugnax%20cognomen&f=false; and in a 2010 submission, Aryanhwy merch Catmael was able to find cognomina with negative meanings in Kajanto, Iiro. The Latin cognomina (Helsinki: Societas Scientiarum Fennica, 1965): Examples include pugnax as quarrelsome or troublesome: Pugnax, Turbantiuis, Rixa http://atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com/8-2010LoP.shtml

The client desires a male name and wishes it to be authentic for Republican Era Rome.


17. Grigor Medvedev: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, June 2014

Azure, two bears combattant Or, on a chief argent, three Latin crosses gules.


The name was registered June 2014.


The original device submission, Azure, two bears combattant Or and on a chief argent a Latin cross between two mullets of eight points gules., was returned “for violating our protection of the Red Cross, "the use of a red straight armed cross with flat, couped ends to the arms on any white background, or in any way that could be displayed on a white background, including as a tertiary charge, even if some of the arms are elongated so that it is not blazonable exactly as a cross couped gules." [Thomas der Kreuzfahrer, R-Middle, January 2009 LoAR]”. Changing the tertiary charges to multiple red (Latin) crosses resolves the issue; the emblems that the legal restrictions relate to are just the ones listed in the Geneva Conventions.


18. Hamasaki Eiwa Miyako: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Sable, a moon in her plentitude argent and a ford.


The name is Japanese. It is referenced in “Name Construction in Medieval Japan,” Solveig Thordardottir.

Page 29: Paragraph 4: references the use of a family/house name, spoken name, and official name by both genders of the buke class.

Page 68: Paragraph 1; reference the use of topographic family/ house names by the buke class, and the correct composition for such.

Hamasaki: hama in the descriptive position, p. 149 and -sake in the substantive position, p. 146.

Eiwa is reference for the spoken name Eiwa, p. 209.

Miyako show the root element miya, p. 138; and the quasi-titular element -ko, p. 4.

The client doesn't care as to the gender of the name. She will not accept Major or Minor Changes to the name.


19. Jaep Van Doornik: NEW NAME

The name is Dutch. Jaep is a male given name found in “Dutch Given Names from 1573,” Sara L. Uckelman (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/dutch/dutch1573.html).

an Doornik is a Dutch locative, the name for the French locale Tournai (ACADEMY OF SAINT GABRIEL REPORT 1924, http://www.s-gabriel.org/1924, http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?1924+0). It appears that the preposition, which is capitalized in the submission, is usually found in lower case (i.e., van).

The client desires a male name.


20. Jakob the Bald: NEW NAME CHANGE, from Garrett Fitzpatrick

The current name was registered April 2003; if the name change is approved, the old name is to be released.


Jakob is a male given name dated to 6 December 1590 as a christening date for Jakob Crsebe as Saint Mary, Woodbridge, Suffolk, England (Batch C06325-2, https://familysearch.org/search/record/results?count=20&query=%2Bgivenname%3AJakob~%20%2Bbirth_place%3AEngland~%20%2Bbirth_year%3A1000-1600~%20%2Brecord_country%3AEngland).
The byname is a physical description of the individual, in Reaney and Wilson (3rd edition, p. 24, s.n. Bald, Bauld), originally referring to rotundity or corpulence, then of baldness c. 1386). The client desires a male name.


21. James Thorn de Lyon: NEW HOUSEHOLD NAME and BADGE, La Maison du Repaire du Lyon

Sable, in pale a lion dormant Or and a house argent.


The personal name was registered November 1993. The household name is French, “House of the Den of the Lion” (http://dictionary.reverso.net/french-english/).

In Cotgreve's 1611 A Dictionaries of the French and English Tongues, repaire is “a lodging or haunt...the denne, or covert wherein a wild beast lurks.”

It appears that the spelling for the beast should be lion, and that the placename is Lyon, and with household names registered with the CoA with those using Maison, that the article La isn't necessary.


A house is a period charge c. 1340 according to the Pictorial Dictionary online, a structure with a sloped roof and the door facing forward.


22. Koga Takashirou Kagehiro: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, a pair of calipers, in chief a pair of swords cross in saltire and a point point ploye sable.


The name is Japanese, and documentation comes from Name Construction in Medieval Japan, Solveig Throndardottir. Koga is a surname, a family clan descended from the Minamoto clan (p. 33, prefix and suffix). Takashirou is the yobina, the prefix Taka found on p. 107 and the suffixes Shi and rou on pages 60 and 211 respectively. Kagehiro is a nanori, found on p. 182.


23. Lilie Simmons: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per bend argent and purpure, a dragonfly vert and a lotus blossom in profile argent.


Lilie may have come from the 1296 form Lilely, a variation of the female given name Elizabeth (“Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames: Elizabeth,” Talan Gwynek, https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/reaney/reaney.cgi?Elizabeth). It was registered to Lilie Rose Sinclair, July 2007.

Simmons is found as written in “Faire Names for English Folk: Late Sixteenth Century English Names,” Chris Laning, https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/christian/fairnames/. Earlier forms tend to have a single -m-, derived from the given name Simon and it variants. Thomas Simmons, has a baptismal record dating to 18 Nov 1580, in All Saints, Bristol, Gloucester, England; his father was Thomas Simmons. (Batch) Number C17270-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N2LF-NY1).

The client desires a female name.


This is reminiscent of the registered armory for Valdisa Álarsdóttir: Per bend sinister vert and sable, a dragonfly and a lotus flower in profile argent., but there are differences for the field division, field tincture, and dragonfly tincture. Both dragonflies are in the default orientation, palewise.


24. Lucia Van Doornik: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Azure, a horse rampant and on a chief argent three tulips slipped and leaved gules.


Lucia is a female given name, dated to 25 December 1530 as a christening date for Lucia Satzmann in Basel, Basel, Switzerland (Batch C73987-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FVNW-FP1). I can also find it dated to 23 November 1576 as a christening name for Lucia Douwens in Oude Kerk Nederlands Hervormde Kerk, Amsterdam, Noord Holland, Netherlands (Batch C90035-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X1XL-TJY).

Van Doornik is a Dutch locative, the name for the French locale Tournai (ACADEMY OF SAINT GABRIEL REPORT 1924, http://www.s-gabriel.org/1924, http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi?1924+0). It appears that the preposition, which is capitalized in the submission, is usually found in lower case (i.e., van).

The client desires a female name.


25. Massimo Rosa da Milano: NEW NAME

The name is Italian.
Massimo is a male given name found in “Italian Names from the Online Tratte of Office Holders 1282-1532,” Aryanhwy merch Catmael, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/tratte/.
The male given name Rosa is found in “A Listing of all Men's Given Names from the Condado Section of the Florence Catasto of 1427,” Juliana de Luna, https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/condado/mensalpha.html.
The locative da Milano, “from Milan,” is found in “Fourteenth Century Venetian Personal Names,” Arval Benicoeur and Talan Gwynek, https://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/venice14/.
SENA notes that double given names are seen in Italian and that locative bynames in the northern and central areas normally take the da X form. The client desires a male name and is most interested in the meaning and language/culture of of the name (Italian, and wanting to be from Milan).


26. Mons Tonitrus, Barony of: NEW BADGE

Argent, a sheaf of arrows between flaunches sable all within a bordure denticulada counterchanged.

This is for the Order of the Sable Arrows (name registered November 2003); it is in addition to the previously-registered badge for the Order, Argent, a sheaf of arrows between flaunches sable all within a bordure counterchanged. (registered November 2003).


27. Mons Tonitrus, Barony of: NEW BADGE

Per fess sable and argent, three chevronels braced counterchanged and on a chief embattled argent a pellet.

This is for the Order of the Sable Chevronels of Mons Tonitrus (name registered January 1991); it is in addition to the previously-registered badge for the Order, Per fess sable and argent, three chevronels braced counterchanged and on a chief argent a pellet. (registered June 1992).


28. Mons Tonitrus, Barony of: NEW BADGE

Per chevron throughout argent and sable, three harps and a bordure denticulada counterchanged.

This is for the Order of the Sable Harps of Mons Tonitrus (name registered January 1991); it is in addition to the previously-registered badge for the Order, Per chevron throughout argent and sable, three harps counterchanged. (registered January 1991).


29. Mons Tonitrus, Barony of: NEW BADGE

Sable, morion helm within a bordure denticulada argent.

This is for the Order of the Silver Morion of Mons Tonitrus (name registered January 1991); it is in addition to the previously-registered badge for the Order, Sable, a morion helm within a bordure argent. (registered January 1992)


30. Natasiia of Nyenskans: NEW NAME CHANGE, from Mariyah al-Madiniyah

The name is Russian.

Natasiia is a female diminutive (13th-14th C.) of the given name Anastasia (A Dictionary of Period Russian Names, Paul Wickenden of Thanet). Nyenskans is the original name of the Swedish settlement that eventually was renamed St. Petersburg. The Swedish fortress there was built in 1611 (http://wikimapia.org/123288/Swedish-fortress-Nyenskans). Juetta Copin comments: “If we know for sure that Nyenskans did not exist in period, I don't think the grey-period documentation can be used to register it. (Also, it seems the correct lingua anglica form is Nyenschantz, while Nyenskans is Swedish, https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nyenschantz )”. Any assistance that can be offered in finding this as a pre-1600 settlement would be appreciated.

The client desires a female name. If registered, the currently-registered name is to be maintained as an alternate.


31. Nia the Pict: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Gules, a natural seahorse Or and a bordure argent.

Nia is shown as the female *Nia Lister with the christening date of 25 February 1643, St. Mary's Church, Gisburn, Lancashire, England, GS film 001657526, https://familysearch.org/search/record/results?count=20&query=%2Bgivenname%3ANia%20%2Bbirth_place%3AEngland~%20%2Bbirth_year%3A1000-1650~.

The most recent registration of Pict was for Neot the Pict, November 2015. "Consideration of Pictish Names," Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn, the Late Latin term Picti (late 3rd C., probably a nickname given them by Roman soldiers), is usually derived from picti, "painted." Neot the Pict is her lord.

The client desires a female name and is most interested in the language/culture of the name.


32. Runa Gígja: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse.
Runa is a female given name found in Nordiskt runnamnslexikon p. 185 sn. Rúna (http://www.sprakochfolkminnen.se/om-oss/arkiv-och-samlingar/nordiskt-runnamnslexikon.html). Rúna is the short form of feminine names in Rún- or -rún.
Gígja, “fiddle, eloquent lawyer,” is a byname in “Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók,” Aryanhwy merch Catmael, www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html. It probably more accurate if diacriticals are omitted entirely (Runa Gigja) or are included throughout the name ( Rúna Gígja).

The client desires a female name and is most interested in the sound of the name (so it sounds like Runa Gigja); she will not accept Major Changes to the name.


33. Tóka Kolbiarnardóttir: NEW NAME CHANGE and NEW DEVICE CHANGE from Astríðr Kolbiarnardóttir

Per chevron inverted argent and gules, a bear dormant sable and a mushroom argent, the cap spotted gules.

The currently-registered name was registered August 2014; if the change is registered, please retain the old one as an alternate. Tóka is found as the female equivalent of the Old Danish male given name Tóki, in Nordiskt runnamnslexikon (The Dictionary of Norse Runic Names), Lena Peterson, p. 196, http://www.sprakochfolkminnen.se/om-oss/arkiv-och-samlingar/nordiskt-runnamnslexikon.html.

The client doesn't care about the gender of the name and is most interested in the sound and the language and/or culture of the name; she would like it authentic for Norse/Danish.


If the new device is registered, please retain the current one, Per saltire purpure and Or, in pale a padlock and a strawberry Or. , as a badge.




There are 15 New Names, 4 New Name Changes, 1 New Household Name, 12 New Devices, 2 New Device Changes and 6 New Badges. These 40 items are chargeable, Laurel should receive $120 for them. OSCAR counts 1 New Holding Name Change. OSCAR counts 1 Resub Name, 1 Resub Name Change and 3 Resub Devices. These 6 items are not chargeable. There are a total of 46 items submitted on this letter.


I was assisted in the preparation of this Letter of Intent by Andreas Lucernensis, Brenna Lowri o Ruthin, Etienne Le Mons, ffride wlffsdotter. Juetta Copin. Maridonna Benvenuti, Sorcha inghen Chon Mhara.


Thank you to those who have provided your wisdom and patience, your expertise and your willingness to share it.



arta as tu Mika-Mysliwy
c/o Linda Miku
2527 East 3rd Street; Tucson AZ 85716
atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com
brickbat@nexiliscom.com











This page is best viewed with a minimum of 800 x 600 resolution, and 16 million colors.