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Kingdom of Atenveldt Home Page

Kingdom of Atenveldt
Heraldic Submissions Page

(administered by the Brickbat Herald)

25 April 2003, A.S. XXXVII

Kingdom of Atenveldt



Unto Their Royal Majesties Jonathan and Deille; Mistress Magdelen Venturosa, Aten Principal Herald; the Heralds in the Atenveldt College of Heralds; and to All Whom These Presents Come,

Greetings from Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, Brickbat Herald!



This is the April 2003 internal Atenveldt Letter of Intent. It precedes the external LoI that will contain the following submissions, asking questions of submitters and local heralds who have worked with them; if these questions are not addressed, the submission may be returned by the Atenveldt College of Heralds. While most of these are on their way to the Laurel level, you are urged to read the commentary on those. I accept online commentary, in addition to questions pertaining to heraldry: brickbat@nexiliscom.com. Please have comments or questions to me, on any armorial matter, by 15 May 2003.



Submissions Website: You can send electronic commentary on the most recent internal LoIs through the site, in addition to any questions you might have. Current submission forms (the ONLY forms that can be used!) can be found on the site. Please let your local populace know about the site, too: atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com.



Please consider for the May 2003 Atenveldt Letter of Intent:



Orion Stürmbruin (Iron Wood Loch): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per fess azure and vert, on a bend cotised between a bear passant and a heart Or, four gouts inverted palewise gules.

No documentation is provided for Orion. Unless a submitter can demonstrate that a name from classical Greek mythology was used in period as a Renaissance "Greek revival" name, it cannot be used as a personal given name. God/dess names, such as Diana (found in England in the 16th C., according to Withycombe, 3rd edition, pp. 83-4), were used in late period, but not all deity names were used. Orion was a famed hunter, the son of non-mortals, son of Neptune and the nymph Eurayle. A quick scan of classical Greek names and Byzantine Greek names in the Medival Names Archive shows nothing close to this as a masculine given name, suggesting that Orion was a name relegated to literature alone. However, "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names (and some of their Slavic roots)," by Paul Wickenden of Thanet does show Orion as a martyr's name, and one used in the 14th C. ( http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/ ). For this reason, Orion can be used as a masculine given name.

The byname is German, "stormbear." Stu/ürm is found in Bahlow's German Names as meaning "storm," as well as "to be noisy, rage, quarrel," and is also in Bahlow's Deutsches Namenlexicon, p. 449 as a German byname. However, "bear" in German is bär, not bruin (which is an English adjective for bear). As a result, this violates Rules for Submission III.1. Name Grammar and Syntax. - All names must be grammatically correct for period names and follow documented patterns. Standard grammatical rules for a language will be applied unless documentation is provided for non-standard usages in period names from that language. Names should generally combine elements that are all from a single linguistic culture, but a name may be registered that combines languages. The coined byname of Stürmbär, with all German elements, would be acceptable, but a byname that is part German and part English, is not. (The Dutch form of the byname would be Stormbeer). The CoA will accept a Russian/German name as a registerable anomaly.

The device is on the edge of complexity, with four charge types and four tinctures used (this matches the Rule of 8). While a field division that doesn't match the ordinary used is occasionally seen, it is very rare, and using it here might be considered making the design too complex and less period in appearance; this is a risk that the submitter should consider, that it might be returned for redesign. The gouts need to be redrawn to look like period period gouts, with are longer; from a distance, the four small charges on the bend are going to look like roundels. Gouts inverted can also be blazoned as icicles.



The following submissions appear in the 25 April 2003 Atenveldt LoI:



Aldred Bertand (Mons Tonitrus): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Vert, on a bend between a gout and a cross bottony argent three roses gules.

The name is English. Aldred is dated to 1086 in Withycombe, 3rd edition, p. 12. Bertrand is an undated English surname, found in Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, p. 30 (s.n. Bartram).



Atenveldt, Kingdom of: NAME RESUBMISSION for the Order of the Desert Flower, Laurel, December 2002

The original name, Le Ordre de le Artisan de Soleil, was returned for lack of documentation showing this pattern in the creation of period order names. This is a complete reworking of the name. It follows a common order name construction, "adjective + thing" (Holy Phial, Precious Blood); information on order names is taken from Project Ordensnamen, by Timothy Shead (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/order/ ). Desert is an adjective which characterizes a desert or desolate place (c. 1450, COED); in period, a desert was considered not just a dry place, but a wilderness, or any uninhabited, uncultivated place (c. 1225). (So the folks in the less "deserty" portions of the realm don't need to feel left out!) This order name is clear of the Order of the Ginger Flower (West) and the Order of the Flower (Outlands) by the addition of a significantly different designator, the term desert.

If registered, this Order name should be associated with the badge registered to the Kingdom of Atenveldt in December 2002, Or, three fleurs-de-lys in pall bases to center azure.



Atenveldt, Kingdom of: NEW ORDER NAME for the Order of the Desert Pilgrim

The order name follows a less common order name construction, "adjective + group" (e.g., Teutonic Knights, Christian Militia); information on order names is taken from Project Ordensnamen, by Timothy Shead (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/order/ ). Desert is an adjective which characterizes a desert or desolate place (c. 1450, COED); in period, a desert was considered not just a dry place, but a wilderness, or any uninhabited, uncultivated place (c. 1225; COED). Additionally, desert also means "deserving, becoming worthy of recompense" (c. 1297), and a little later, meritorious. A pilgrim is a traveller or one who journeys, usually over long distances, usually to a holy or sacred destination (c. 1225). This award recognizes continuing effort and excellence in historical recreation.

If registered, this Order name should be associated with two badges that appear in the 15 March 2003 Atenveldt LoI, submitted under the Kingdom fo Atenveldt: Azure, in pale an escallop shell argent and a demi-sun issuant from base Or., and Azure, in pale an escallop shell and a demi-sun issuant from base Or.



Atenveldt, Kingdom of: NAME and BADGE RESUBMISSION for Order of the Desert Star from Laurel, December 2002

Per fess indented azure and argent, in chief four mullets of four points elongated palewise Or and in base a sun in splendor azure.

The original name, La Ordern de la Luz de las Estrellas, was returned for lack of documentation showing this pattern of order names used in period. This is a complete reworking of the name. It follows a common order name construction, "adjective + thing" (Holy Phial, Precious Blood); information on order names is taken from Project Ordensnamen, by Timothy Shead (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/order/ ). Desert is an adjective which characterizes a desert or desolate place (c. 1450, COED); in period, a desert was considered not just a dry place, but a wilderness, or any uninhabited, uncultivated place (c. 1225). Star, as a celestial body, dates to c. 825. There is a southwestern flower known as the desert star and as the bellyflower, a member of the sunflower family, Monoptilon bellioides, and this common name doesn't seem much more unusual than other common plant names known in period.

The original badge, Per chevron inverted azure mullety argent and argent., was returned for conflict. The resubmission uses the badge registered for Estrella War by the Kingdom of Atenveldt in November 2002, Per fess indented azure and argent, in chief four mullets of four points elongated palewise Or., as this award recognizes service to the Estrella War effort.



Atenveldt, Kingdom of: NAME and BADGE RESUBMISSION for Order of the Radiant Servants from Laurel, December 2002

Argent, a sun in splendor per saltire Or and azure and a bordure indented azure.

The original name, La Ordern del Sirviente del Sol, was returned for lack of documentation showing this pattern for order names in period. This is a complete reworking of the name. Radiant, "shining brightly," is first applied to stars (1450), and then it becomes a descriptor for more tangible items, such as Christ's body (1510), Pyramus (a character within the play within A Midsummer Night's Dream, 1590), and an eagle's eye (1604); its meaning as "bright, shining, splendid" comes into the language later as a descriptive for the god Phoebus (1509), and for a beauty (that is, a comely woman) in 1601. The term Servant, for one who is under obligation to work for the benefit of a superior, is found c. 1225; by 1570, it is also applied to the any state official in the expression of his relation to his sovereign, i.e., a civil servant (all dated citations from COED). If the plural of a group is not considered acceptable by the College, Order of the Radiant Servant is a reasonable alternative.

The original badge, Azure, a demi-sun Or., was returned for conflict. This is a redesign.



Atenveldt, Kingdom of : NAME AND BADGE RESUBMISSION for the Order of the Scarab, Laurel, December 2002

Or, a scarab beetle vert and a bordure indented azure.

The original name, the Order of the Builders of Atenveldt, was returned for issues concerning its following a pattern of order names used in period as required by RfS III.2.b.ii., and whether or not the name is generic, and so may not be registered to a single group. This is a complete reworking of the name, and this new name follows one of the most common order name practices, using a "thing" (such as a Garter or a Thistle); information on order names is taken from Project Ordensnamen, by Timothy Shead (http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/order/ ). Scarab refers to any generic beetle, particularly those that were thought in period to be engendered by dung; its use is cited in 1579, according to the COED. (In Egyptian mythology, where our kingdom derives part of its name, the scarab was thought to keep the sun rolling in the heavens on a daily basis, a very important task; similarly, the groups who receive this accolade keep our realm moving precisely.)

The original badge, Per pale azure and Or, a sun counterchanged., was returned for conflict. This is a complete redesign.



Aylwin Wyllowe (Atenveldt): NEW DEVICE

Per chevron sable and vert, a bordure argent charged with three triquetras vert.

The name appears in the 20 January 2003 Atenveldt Letter of Intent.



Brigit inghean ui Chumaráin (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per bend purpure and Or, a butterfly Or and three columbines purpure, slipped and leaved vert.

The name is Irish. Brigit is a feminine given name, the name of several Irish saints (pp. 36-7, Ó Corráin and Maguire). Cameron is one of the great Scottish clans, rendered into Camshrón ("crooked nose") in Gaelic; Woulfe maintains that in Ireland, the name became Ó Cumaráin (p. 35, MacLysaght, s.n. Cameron). We have tried to render it completely into Irish Gaelic, "Brigit daughter of a male descendant of Cameron," following guidelines and lenition found in "Quick and Easy Gaelic Names Formerly Published as "Quick and Easy Gaelic Bynames," 3rd Edition, Sharon L. Krossa (http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#givennames).



Clara de La Mare (Mons Tonitrus): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Purpure, an increscent and on a chief embattled argent, three increscents purpure.

Clara is an English feminine given name, from the Latin Clara, dating to 1210 (Withycombe, 3rd edition, p. 67). de La Mare is found in "Sixteenth Century Norman Names," Cateline de la Mor (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/cateline/norman16.html ). While the French form of Clara is Claire, there is probably more than enough interaction between cultures that Clara would be found with a Norman name as easily as Claire.



Clarastella MacGregor (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME

Clarastella is an Italian feminine given name, found in "Feminine Given Names from

Thirteenth Century Perugia," Arval Benicoeur ( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/perugia/ ). MacGregor is a Scottish family name found in Black's The Surnames of Scotland, p. 505. The College of Arms considers an Italian/Scots name a registerable weirdness.



Diek Rabynovich (Granite Mountain): NEW NAME

The name is Russian, with elements taken from "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names (and some of their Slavic roots)," Paul Wickenden of Thanet ( http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/ ). Diek is a 1415 variation of the masculine given name Dik. Rabyn is a masculine given name. Submitted as Rabynovich, it seems that the correct use of a -vich patronymic with a name ending in -n would be Rabynich, dropping the "ov" ("Grammar of Period Russian Names," Paul Wickenden of Thanet, http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/zgrammar.html ), yet a cited 15th C. patronymic does include the missing syllable, Rabynov, so perhaps Rabynovich is acceptable.



Dragos Severin (Atenveldt): NAME RESUBMISSION from Kingdom, March 2003

The original name submission, Severin Mure Dragos, had a number of problems, some of them stemming from elements that weren't name elements and a mixing of Russian and Romanian name elements (see 20 Jan 2003 Atenveldt IloI for discussion). The submitter has chosen to submit the name as Dragos Severin. The name is Romanian. Dragos is found as a masculine given name in "Names from the Royal Lines of Moldavia and Wallachia," Aryanhwy merch Catmael ( http://www.sit.wisc.edu/~sfriedemann/names/romanian.htm ), c. 1350. "A Documented Chronology of Roumanian History," by Matila Ghyka, 1941 (http://members.fortunecity.com/aromanian/ghika.html ), shows Severin as a place name/town, "...King Bela IV established by charter the Knights Hospitallers of St. John in the Banate of Severin." From the names seen in http://www.ici.ro/romania/history/hi93.html (Rulers from Moldavia), Romanian name construction includes locatives: Movila, "hillock", cel Mare "sea," which would allow this name submission to be translated as "Dragos of Severin."



Ena Weshen-eskey gav (Mons Tonitrus): NEW NAME

Ena is found in Withycombe (3rd edition, p. 104) as a semi-Anglicization of the Irish feminine and masculine given name Eithne; O Corrain and Maguire corroborate this under Eithne (pp. 84-5), citing anglicized forms as Anne, Annie and Ena. Weshen-eskey gav is the Romany name for Epping, England ( http://www.eppingmapproject.org.uk/history.htm ), "Forest town," found in Romano Lavo-Lil, by George Borrow (p. 91). Borrow comments that the Rom have dual names, one that is used among themselves, and one that is used to outsiders, or Gentiles; these public names "are quite English" (Borrow writes from his experience of dealing with Rom living in England). Adopting a common given name like Ena as a public name would seem to make sense. (Borrow's book can be found at http://www.ibiblio.org/gutenberg/etext01/rmlav10.txt). While Borrow maintains that Rom bynames were based on either tradenames or family names (usually taken from aristocratic families who permitted immigrating Rom to settle on their lands), the use of a locative byname doesn't seem unreasonable.



Eadric Longfellow (Tir Ysgithr): NEW BADGE

(fieldless) Two stalks of barley crossed in saltire within and conjoined to an annulet Or.

The name is in submission, appearing in the 20 October 2002 Atenveldt LoI.



Eadric Longfellow (Tir Ysgithr): NEW HOUSEHOLD NAME Tagstern and BADGE

(fieldless) A mullet of four points gyronny sable and argent within and conjoined to an annulet argent.

The personal name is in submission, appearing in the 20 October 2002 Atenveldt LoI.

The household name is German and means "Daystar." While it refers to supernova that appeared in 1006 A.D. and that could be seen in the daylight sky with the naked eye (and which appearance is recorded in chronicles in China, Egypt, Italy and Switzerland), "daystar" also refers the morning star (Venus) as far back as c. 1000 A.D., according to the COED; Venus appears to be a commonly-referenced astronomical artifact in several cultures. Similar German compound nouns include Polarstern "polar/pole star", along with the more fanciful Glücksstern, "luck star." Based on the English inn sign names Sterre, c. 1322 ("Star") and various spellings for "Sevenstar" (Sevensterre,1355; Seuesterrys, 1379; Sevesterre1384), an inn sign with the name Daystar, or Tagstern, for its German equivalent, seems reasonable ("English Sign Names," Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/inn/ ). If required, the household indicator Haus may be added to the name (e.g., Tagsternhaus); this follows the naming practices seen in Hoffbrauhaus, a German brewery dated back to 1160 A.D. ( http://www.hofbrauhaus-freising.de ).



Finbarr Mathgamain mac Conchobair (Tir Ysgithr): NEW BADGE, jointly held with Aífe Fael ingen Brénainn

Azure, semy of compass stars, on a flame Or a crescent azure.

Both personal names were registered July 2001.



Gallant O'Driscoll (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per chevron vert and argent, two double-bitted axes argent and a compass rose sable.

Gallant is an English given name; a Gallant Fitz Richard is noted in 1210 (p. 139, Reaney and Wilson, s.n. Gallant). O'Driscoll is an Anglicized form of the Irish family name Ó Drisceoil (p. 90, MacLysaght).



Gavin Skot of Stirling (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Sable, in pale a pair of swords crossed in saltire argent and a standing balance Or.

Gavin is a Lowland Scot name, cited in 1477 and 1577, "Concerning the Names Gavin, Gawaine, Gavan, and Gabhainn," 2nd edition, Josh Mittleman ( http://www.medievalscotland.org/problem/names/gavin.shtml ), and said by Black to be a favorite forename throughout Strathclyde (pp. 292-3). Skot, a variant spelling of Scot (which might be an erroneous transcription, but one that appears three times in 1521) is found in "Early 16th Century Scottish Lowland Names," Draft Edition Sharon L. Krossa ( http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/lowland16/ ), s.n. Scot.

Stirling, Scotland, was granted a Royal Charter in the 12th C.; Stirling's importance developed from the fact that it controlled the lowest crossing point of the River Forth. ( http://www.stirling.co.uk/ ).

The charge groups are of equal visual weight and should be consider co-primaries.



Heleyne Scot of Motherwell (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, in pale three thistles vert, blossomed purpure, between flaunches vert.

Heleyne is given an 1538 citation in "Early 16th Century Scottish Lowland Names," Sharon L. Krossa ( http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/lowland16/ ). Scot is a variant of the Scottish family name Scott (Black, pp. 714-5), with this spelling cited in 1395. Motherwell is a town near Glasgow, in Lanarkshire, Scotland, referred to as Materville in 1250 and Moydrwal in 1265 (http://www.geocities.com/scotlandsmahame/motherwellhistory.html



Ivan Petrovich (Tir Ysgithr): NEW DEVICE

Per pall inverted gules between two turtles and a single-horned anvil reversed sable.

The name was registered January 2002.



Johari al-Noori (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, a Turkish tulip bendwise withing a bordure indented purpure.

Johari is cited in a name website for Middle Eastern dancers ("Names for Dancers and Other Graceful Souls," kharding@lamar.colostate.edu). I have a tendency to look at these sites as not being much better than baby name books, when name lists are created without much interest in the periodicity of the names. It is said to be Swahili/Kiswhahili for "jewel"; this is something of a problem in itself, as Swahili is something of an "invented" language, based on sub-Saharan Bantu languages, with influences by Arabic, Persian and Portugese traders (in culture and language). Yet, the term for "jewel" in Arabic is jauhara (p. 150, A Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, Hans Wehr,, 3rd Printing, MacDonald and Evans Ltd., London, 1980), not much of a transliterated departure from Johari, Originally submitted as the Arabic Ya Noor, "O Light," which is one of the one hundred most beautiful names of Allah ("The One Hundred Most Beautiful Names of God," Mustapha al-Muhaddith ibn al-Saqaat, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mustapha/cnamesofgod.html), while some of these names (such as those meaning Faithful and Generous) fit into the idea of a lakab, a combination of words into a cognomen or epithet, usually religious, relating to nature, a descriptive, or of some admirable quality the person has or would like to have ("Arabic Naming Practices And Period Names List," Da'ud ibn Auda, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/daud/arabic-naming/) something as insubstantial as "light, ray of light" might not be fitting. However, nr/noori means "bright, shining, radiant" (p. 1009, Wehr,) and could be applied to the blonde color of the submitter's hair or to her bright, pleasing face; as a result, al-Noori would mean "Johari the Bright." This diverts from the more standard given name + patronymic construction ('ism + nasab) one usually sees in Arabic names. The submitter wishes the name authentic for language and/or culture.

This long blossom with thin petals is consistent with renderings of tulips on 16th C. Syrian and Iznik ceramics, and illustrations by the herbalist Gerard (The Tulip: the Story of a Flower That Has Made Men Mad, Anna Pavord, London: Bloomsbury, 1999).



Natal'ia Dieka zhena Raynovicha (Granite Mountain): NEW NAME

The name is Russian, with elements taken from "A Dictionary of Period Russian Names (and some of their Slavic roots)," Paul Wickenden of Thanet ( http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/ ). Natal'ia is dated to 1371. Diek is a 1415 variation of the masculine given name Dik. Rabyn is a masculine given name. Submitted as Rabynovich, it seems that the correct use of a -vich patronymic with a name ending in -n would be Rabynich, dropping the "ov" ("Grammar of Period Russian Names," Paul Wickenden of Thanet, http://www.sca.org/heraldry/paul/zgrammar.html ), yet a cited 15th C. patronymic does include the missing syllable, Rabynov, so perhaps Rabynovich is acceptable. Paul's "Grammar" also demonstrates the association of a wife to her husband by the addition of the word zhena, "wife," and her husband's given name and patronymic to her own given name, adding the feminizing ending -a to those elements. Paul demonstrates the construction with Katerinka Stepanova zhena Proniakina (1538-9), who had married Stepan Proniakin.



Sláine O'Connor: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, December 2002

Gules, a frog and a chief dovetailed Or.

The original submission was returned for redrawing, as the orientation of the frog was not a standard one; the submitter is using a more accurate depiction of a frog.





I remain,







Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy

c/o Linda Miku

2527 East 3rd Street, Tucson AZ 85716

bagbaazai@nexiliscom.com; Atenveldt Submissions Website: atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com





Please consider the following submission for the May 2003 Atenveldt LoI:







Orion Stürmbruin


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