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ATENVELDT COLLEGE OF HERALDS 30 March 2015, A.S. XLIX
Letter of Intent Kingdom of Atenveldt


Unto Andrewe Laurel; Lillia Pelican; Brunissende Wreath; and the commenting Members of the College of Arms,

Greetings from Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, Brickbat Herald and Parhelium Herald for the Kingdom of Atenveldt!


Estrella War XXXI: Hurrah! Wonderful weather (that kept us guessing), a slightly different location, and Great Heralds and Clients – what's not to love about the Heralds' Point Consultation Table? Many thanks are extended to a modest-in-number-yet-amazing-in-dedication to those who spent much of their time in consultation. Most submissions came from Atenveldt, future submitters came from a number of Kingdoms, and those consulting them came across a number of borders. I recommend with praise Symond Bayard le Gris, Herald's Point coordinator/manager; Finngall McKetterick Matilda Stolja, Red Tree Pursuivant (Madone) from An Tir; Eridana Ambra Dragotta (Ambre P.) from Caid; Warenus de Fulmere (I hope from Nahrun Kabirun and the loaner of its heraldic library) from the Outlands; and our own kind – Sorcha inghen Chon Mhara (Prism P.), Honour Grenehart, Roger von Allenstein, Séamus mac Ríáin (Black Boar P.) and Symond Bayard.


The Atenveldt College of Heralds requests the consideration and registration of the following names and armory with the College of Arms.

Unless specifically stated, the client will accept any spelling and grammar corrections; all assistance is appreciated.


1. Agnes Carrick: NEW NAME

The name is English.

Agnes is a feminine given name (and later, a surname), dated from 1153 and running through period (Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, s.n. Agnes, p. 160).

Carrick is generally a locative byname, from the district of Carrick in Ayr (ibid., s.n. Carrick, Carrerk, p. 84). Carrick itself is dated to 1569 s.n. Carrick in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue" (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/dost/carrick.html).


2. Aileann inghean Conall: NEW NAME

The name is Irish Gaelic.

Aileann is a feminine given name dated to c. 943 (“Dated Names Found in Ó Corráin & Maguire's Irish Names,” Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/ocm/OCM-FemGivAlpha.shtml).

Submitted as Conall, the client asks that the name be lenited correctly, and the Old Irish Gaelic (c 700-c 900) genitive form for the masculine given name Conall is Conaill; the name is found throughout period (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Conall,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Conall.shtml). Blue Tyger suggests that the lenition should be Chonaill. (It seems T and C leniteprior to 1200 AD.)

It seems that the particle is ingen in names before 1200 AD (“Quick and Easy Gaelic Names,” 3rd edition,Sharon L. Krossa, http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#spelling).

The client wants a female name.


3. Ailric Atte Grange: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per pale embattled sable and argent, a hare and a squirrel combattant counterchanged.


Ailric le Carpentier is dated 1166-1212 (http://www.geni.com/people/Ailric-le-Carpentier/60000002248212461). It may come from Arthurian legend, according to the client, although this name doesn't appear in An Index of the Arthurian Names in Middle English, by R.W.Ackerman. Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, do demonstrate Ailricus and Ældricus de Burc in 1066 DB and William Ailric 1209, s.n. Aldrich et al., pp. 5-6. The Latin given name Ailricus would seem reasonable to have the vernacular form Ailric.
atte Grange is dated to 1296, “a dweller near or worker near a grange” (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Grange p. 202). It's most likely more correct if the particle is spelled atte, as R&W do not capitalize the preposition.


4. al-Haddad ibn `Abd al-Jabbār: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Sable, a bend sinister embattled between a mouse rampant contourny and an increscent Or.

The name is Arabic.

Al-Haddad, “the blacksmith,” is a masculine cognomen used as an 'ism (given name).

ibn is a patronymic particle, “son of,” (Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices,” Da'ud ibn Auda, http://heraldry.sca.org/names/arabic-naming2.htm.). `

Abd al-Jabbār is a masculine 'ism found in al-Andalus (“Arabic Names from al-Andalus: Masculine isms,” Juliana de Luna, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/alandalus/mascism.html).

The client wants a male name and is most interested in the language/culture of the name (Arabic). He will not accept Major changes to the name.


5. Alkibiades Attikou Argeios: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Vert, a turtle rampant argent and in chief three goblets Or each entwined with a serpent argent.


The name is Greek.

Submitted as Alkibades son of Attikos of Argos, the client asked that it be rendered completely into classical Greek.

Alcibiades was a famous Greek general (450 BC-404 BC), but Alkibades was not. (It seems the client misspelled it and had originally thought of the soldier's name, http://www.britannica.com/EBchecked/topic/13306/Alcibiades .)

The Lexicon of Greek Personal Names (LGPN), http://www.lgpn.ox.ac.uk/names/practices.html, has several hundred instances of the given male name Attikos, and the patronymic form for that is Attikou, putting it into the genitive case.

Someone from Argos would be called Argeios. It can be found via Google Books in "A Greek-English Lexicon: Based on the German Work of Francis Passow, Part 1" by Liddel and Scott (https://books.google.com/books?id=kFNFAAAAYAAJ&printsec=frontcover&dq=liddell+and+scott&hl=en&sa=X&e i=Jtf_VJ6nJNPSoATykYCoAg&ved=0CDIQ6AEwAQ#v=onepage&q=liddell%20and%20scott&f=false), p. 203, first column.
So, his name would be Alkibiades Attikou Argeios. In Greek transliteration: Ἀλκιβιάδες Ἀττικοὺ Ἀργεῖος

[Thanks to Seamus mac Riain, Black Boar Pursuivant, for working on this (I figured with his current enrollment in Classical Greek, he knew I'd be after him): he has also contacted the client and he is fine with his first name being Alkibiades.]

The client wants a male name and is most interested in the language/culture of the name (Greek); he asks that it be rendered completely into Greek.


A few commenters had difficulty identifying the serpents wrapped around the goblets.


6. Alpin Hunter: NEW NAME

Alpin is the name of several Pictish kings. It can be dated to 1287 for Alpinus, canon of Dunblane, and for Alpin mac Donald, a witness for a charter of the halfpenny land of the church of Killilan that was granted to the monks of Paisley in 1295 (Black, The Surnames of Scotland, s.n. Alpin, Alpine, p. 20).

Hunter is a surname derived from that occupation: John the hunter was a juror on an inquisitions made of the lands of Hopkelchoc in 1259 (ibid, s.n. Hunter, p. 370).


7. Aoibhenn inghean Ui Maille: NEW NAME

Aoihenn appears as a woman who died c. 1066 (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Aíbinn,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Aibinn.shtml, Raw Data table).

Ui Maille is found in the Annals of the Four Masters, Part 23, “Tadhg Ua Maille, lord of Umhall, was drowned with his ship at Ara.” (M1124.14) (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/published/G100005B/index.html)

Since this element is pre-1200, the proper patronymic marker is ingen, rather than inghean.

The client wants a female name and is more interested in the sound of the name; the first name must sound like “even.”


8. Archibald Henderson: NEW NAME

Archibald is dated to 1578 in a marriage record for Archibald Wyler, married in Perth, Scotland (Batch M11387-4, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XY3K-7ZW).

Henderson is dated to 1575 in a marriage record for Thomas Henderson, married in Saint Nicholas, Aberdeen, Scotlane (Batch M11168-2, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:XTJD-RQM). This makes for a solid 16th C Scots name.


9. Arnfríðr Friðreksdotter : NEW NAME CHANGE from Fíne ingen huí Chatháin and NEW BADGE

(badge) Azure, a sea-turtle bendwise sinister Or.


The original name was registered June 2010. If the new name is registered, the current one should be maintained as an alternate.

Elements are found in “The Old Norse Name,” Geirr Bassi Haraldsson.

Arnfríðr is a feminine given name (p. 7)

Friðrekr (p. 9) is a male given name. The patronymic should be Friðreksdottír to either maintain all the diacriticals or omit them (p. 17)The client desires a female name and wishes it to be authentic for language/culture (none given, but I suspect ON).


10. Bergdís Berbeinn: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse, with elements found in “The Old Norse Name,” Geirr Bassi Haraldsson.

Bergdís is a female given name, p. 8.

Berbeinn is a byname, “bare-leg,” p. 20.


11. Beth of Granite Mountain: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, in fess a natural dolphin embowed azure and a sheaf of arrows gules, a chief counter-ermine.


Beth is the client's legal given name, incorporating the legal name allowance in SENA PN1B2e. It is also a period name, found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Beth Conye; Female; Marriage 1568; Saxilby, Lincoln, England; Batch: M03076-3 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NKQQ-MJJ)
Beth Green; Female; Christening 20 Oct 1544; Hartford, Huntingdon, England; Batch: C16869-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NK2M-HZK)

It is also found in a Dutch name: Beth Willems; female; Chistening 1567, Netherlands. Batch: C90035-1
(https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:X1XG-VM9)

Granite Mountain is her branch name, permitted per the Branch Name Allowance, SENA PN1B2f. The Barony's name is currently in submission. The client wants a female name.


Cameron MacLaren: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Azure, a lion sejant contourny argent maintaining a shepherd's crook Or between three triskeles argent.


Cameron is the client's legal middle name, with a copy of his driver's license provided to Laurel; this incorporates the legal name allowance in SENA PN1B2e. Cameron is a late period surname as well, which can be used as a given name: from IGI James Cameron, christened June 1632, Inveravon, Banff, Scotland, whose father's name was Angus Camerson, Batch C11157-2 (https://familysearch.org/search/collection/igi/results?count=20&query=%2Bgivenname%3AJames~%20%2Bsurname%3ACameron~%20%2Bbirth_year%3A1600-1650~%20%2Bany_place%3AScotland~%20%2Bbatch_number%3AC11157-2%20%2Bsubcollection_id%3A5&igi=%281%202%29).
MacLaren is the header found in Black, p. 534, with McLaren dated to 1592.


Cathal Finn Ó Briain: NEW BADGE

Argent, semy of lozenges,a bordure gules.

The name was registered November 2006.

The badge uses elements from his registered device Argent semy of lozenges, a bordure sable.

Caylye Gaspur: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Azure, a wolf-headed beaver rampant, a bordure Or semy of triskelions of spirals gules.


The name is English.

Caylye Clark, a woman, was christened in York, England in 1633 (Batch P00909-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NRS5-P8Y).

Gaspur is an English surname dated to 1545 for James Gaspur (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Gayspur, p. 187).

The client wants a female name, and is most interested in the meaning and sound of the name. She will not accept Major changes to the name.


Ceara inghean Chárthaigh: NEW DEVICE

Argent, a schnecke purpure and in chief a lizard tergiant fesswise vert.


The name was registered July 2002.


Decima Aspenewell: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, a tree blasted and eradicated, on a bordure purpure semy of cogwheels argent.


The name is English.

Decima is found as a given name dated to 1327 for Decima de Alverton (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Alverton, p. 9).

The byname is dated to 1246 for Henry de Aspenewell (ibid., s.n. Aspinall et al., p. 17).

The client wants a female name and is more interested in the language/culture (English); she will not accept Major changes to the name.


The client has been told that she doesn't need quite so many cogwheels if she prefers to draw less.


Dominic de la Mer: BADGE RESUBMISSION from Kingdom, March 2014

(Fieldless) A fox sejant gardant queue-forchy proper within and conjoined to an annulet vert.


The name was registered August 2008.


The client uses elements of her registered device, Or, a fox sejant guardant queue-forchy proper maintaining in its mouth a feather purpure, all between three roundels vert.


Dubhchobhlaigh inghean Eoin uí Ealaighthe: HH NAME RESUBMISSION Laurel, November 2014, House of Green Cart

The personal name was registered May 2008.

The original household name submission, Short Straw Cart House, was returned because no evidence was provided that a phrase such as Short Straw or Short Straw Cart was known in period, or that such a phrase or cliché would be a plausible basis of a household name. Although we do have evidence of households named after people, and Short Straw Cart was documented as a full name, we have no examples of household names containing double bynames or double given names. We only have a single example of the pattern full name + house, sir Henry Percy house, which has the pattern title + given name + byname + house. One example does not a pattern make. Without further evidence to show that this construction is plausible, we cannot register this household name. We note that a more common pattern is House of given name + surname. Upon resubmission, the submitter may wish to know that House of Short Straw or House of Short Cart would be registerable.”

The client has developed a new household name, House of Green Cart.

Cart is seen c.1200, from Old Norse kartr or a similar Scandinavian source, akin to and replacing Old English cræt "cart, wagon, chariot" (http://etymonline.com/index.php?allowed_in_frame=0&search=cart&searchmode=none).

The color of grass or growing plants, green is seen before 1200 (http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/green).

House, preceding the name of a household, has been registered many times by the College of Arms.recently as House of Castle Rookwell, June 2014.

The client is most interested in the meaning of the name and will not accept Major or Minor changes to the name.


Emma Mordeboice: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, a butterfly purpure and in chief three seeblatter vert.


Emma Adams is dated in 1595 in marriage records 1538-1973 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N255-W59, Batch M05113-1).

Mordeboice dates to 1644, a nickname, “bite wood” (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Mortiboy, Mortiboys, p. 315).

The client wants a female name, and is most interested in the byname. She will not accept Major changes to the name.


Enia al-Andalusiyya: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per fess embattled azure and argent, a crossbow inverted an a dumbek counterchanged.


Enia is a feminine given name dated to 1539 as a christening name for Enia Gomez (Batch C87115-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FR79-5JD).

al-Andalusiyya is a reasonable extrapolation locative byname or geographical nisba, “the woman from al-Andalus,” from the masculine al-Andalusī, “the man from al-Andalus”, for masculine nicknames ending with the suffix replaced with the feminine version -iyya, in “Andalusian Names: Arabs in Spain,” Juliana de Luna,

http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/andalusia/#Locative.

My concern with the name is that the only citation for the given name occurs some time after the Reconquista, and I doubt anyone would refer to anywhere in Spain as al-Andalus by then. While several commenters agreed, Basil Dragonstrike notes that “the last tattered remnants of al-Andalus disappeared in 1492. Still, by SENA Appendix C, Arabic and Iberian can be mixed; although Enia is attested in 1539, it could easily have been in use much earlier, well before the fall of Gharnāṭah.” Still, he goes on: “OTOH, when the Muslim presence in Spain was reduced to Gharnāṭah after the fall of Cordoba (1236), Murcia (1243) and the Algarve (1249), I doubt that the term "al-Andalus" was used, as it no longer referred to the actual situation. IOW, al-Andalus was gone, and only a remnant, known as Gharnātah, still existed. Still, AFAICS, by SENA this name has a registrable mix of languages.”

The client wants a female name and is most interested in the meaning and sound of the name.


Eoin the Steward: NEW DEVICE

Argent, on a hurt a cross couped argent, a base sable.


The name was registered July 2009.


Eric Edgarson: NEW NAME CHANGE, from Otto Christoph von Frankenau

Otto Christoph von Frankenau was registered October 2011. If the name change is registered, retain this as an alternate name.

The name is English. Eric Skynn was christened 1587 in Cornwall, England (C02222-2, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J3SM-R9X). Edgar is a common male given name, often used as an unmarked patronymic (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Edgar et al., p. 150). Although it can't be found, this byname follows the marked patronymic construction by adding -son. (James Edgaresone was registered in December 2012, with the original name submission of Edgarson.)


Feradach Dubh: NEW NAME

The name is Irish Gaelic.

Feradach is a male given name found in “100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland,” compiled by Heather Rose Jones (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/irish100/). These names are found before 1100.

Dubh is Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c 1200-c 1700), a descriptive term for “black” (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Descriptive Bynames: Dub / Dubh,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Dub.shtml). The client wants a male name and is most interested in the sound; he will not accept Major changes to the name.


Friedrich Swartzen Hut (Ered Sul): NEW NAME CHANGE from Godfrey of Argyle, and NEW DEVICE CHANGE

Lozengy bendy azure and argent, a hat sable.

The original name was registered July 2007. If the new name is registered, please release the currently-registered name.

The name is German. Friedrich is a masculine given name (1451-1500) found in “Late Period German Masculine Given Names,” Talan Gwynek, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/germmasc/. Swartzen is a surname found in “German Names from Rottweil, Baden-Württemberg, 1441,” Sara L. Uckelman, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/rottweilsur.html. Hut is a surname dated to 1577 in a marriage recordin Pfalz, Bavaria, for Hanns Hut (Batch M97191-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J4YG-NVW). Given+byname+descriptive is found in German name construction, but a double byname, while rare, is also found (SENA, Appendix A, German names).

If the new device submission is registered, the currently-registered device, Quarterly gules and sable, a quadrant and in chief a pair of shackles conjoined by a chain fesswise Or.. is to be released.


Garth MacPhail: NEW DEVICE

Per chevron sable and gules, a clenched hand sustaining a quill pen, on a chief argent, the words “Manu Forti cum Verba” sable.

The name was registered July 2012.

The phrase is a construct of the Latin motto Manu Forti, “with a strong hand,” and cum Verba, “with words.” Rifling through my old Latin text from high school, this might be more correct as Verbis. The client is a writer, and this is an interpretation of the pen being mightier than the sword. Any assistance with the grammar is appreciated.


Geneviève de Lironcourt: NEW BADGE

Sable, a stalk of celery and a carrot crossed in sinister, and in chief an onion, all argent.

The name was registered November 2002.


The client is a chef by training and wishes to display the ingredients for a mirepoix (and if it happens to look rather Jolly Rogerish, that's good, too – I hadn't realized that many chefs today have a bent toward piratical tattoos). The emblazon is designed so that the onion is a secondary charge.

Genta Ishimashū of the North: NEW NAME

The name is Japanese, and information comes from Academy of Saint Gabriel report 2019.

Genta is a 16th C. yobina (“private” given name used by family or close associates).

Ishimashū is a construct: ishi, “rock” + mashū, from Mount Mashū in Hokkaido. This seems to be a plausible placename, and such placenames commonly served as a family name. I think it might be more correct if these elements were reversed (Ishimashū Genta).

of the North is an English phrase, referring to Hokkaido.

The client desires a male name.


Gregory von Dargun: NEW NAME

Gregory is the client's given name, and he uses SENA PN.1.B.2.e Legal Name Allowance (copy of DMV license provided to Laurel). It is also found as a given name for a child christened 1593 in Putzig, Prussia (today Puck in Poland). Batch no. C99600-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V4PQ-M8K). (SENA Appendix C for German allows mixing between German/"North Slavic" which includes Polish, if the record coming from Putzig/Puck is a problem.)

von Dargun, “from Dargun,” refers to a place name dated to 1436, 1448 (2) and 1453 and is found in “15th Century Low German Men's Names from Mecklenburg,” Sara L. Uckelman, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/mecklenburg.html.


Hreiðarr Eiríkrson: NEW NAME

The name is ON and elements are found in “The Old Norse Name,” Geirr Bassi Haraldsson.

Hreiðarr (p. 11) and Eiríkr (p. 9) are male given names.

It seems that the byname is more accurate as Eiríksson.

The client wants a male name and wishes it authentic for name/culture (none given, but I suspect Old Norse).


Jaku'an Kakujo: NEW BADGE

Sable, in pale an increscent and a decresent conjoined in fess, and the letter V, all within a hexagon voided and fracted at all vertices argent.


The name was registered October 2014. A hexagon fracted, with less fracting, is seen in the device (and also the badge) for Furukusu Tatsujirou Masahide, registered July 2006: Sable, a pine tree within a hexagon voided and fracted per pall, argent. According to SENA Appendix G, a hexagon has been ruled a SFPP.


Keane Unnrson of Gyldenholt: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per fess sable and azure, on a fess embowed argent a sea-serpent ondoyant gules.


Keane is the client's legal given name (DMV license attested by Black Boar Pursuivant) and so invokes SENA PN.1.b.2.e. Legal Name Allowance.

Unnrson is an Old Norse matronymic from the female given name Unnr (p. 15, “The Old Norse Name,” Geirr Bassi Haraldsson), although it might be more accurately constructed as Unnsson, p. 17. ffride wlffsdotter comments: “Lind col. 1061 notes the genitive of Unnr is Unnar, hence the byname would be Unnarson.” (I'm fine with that.)

The Barony of Gyldenholt's name was registered in 1980. The client wants a male name and is most interested in the meaning, “ocean-son/wave-son.”

He will not accept Major changes to the name.


Malise MacClure: NEW NAME

Malise Bane is cited as a juror on a land inquest in 1320 (Black, The Surnames of Scotland, s.n. Bane, p. 510) and as a header in the same source p. 578, citing several individuals with this as a given name but with no dates given. Although registered in January 2004 without comment on that element as Malise of Sundragon, it was registered as Malis Lauird in May 2007: “Submitted as Malise Lauird, the cited documentation does not support Malise as a period spelling. Black, The Surnames of Scotland, cites a Malise Bane in 1320. An examination of the source from which this name was drawn, Cartularium Comitatus de Levenax p.p. 47-48, shows that it is Black's (modern) translation of a name that appears in Latin as a part of the full name Gillemore filio Malisei dicti Bane. It is highly likely that this name is a Latin representation of a Gaelic name and not an indication of an Anglicized or Norman spelling. Therefore, this precedent still applies: “Submitted as Malise der Totschläger, the given name, Malise, was documented from Withycombe, The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, as an Anglicization of the Gaelic name Mael Iosa. Withycombe is not a reliable source for non-English names or for anglicizations of Gaelic names. However, Black, The Surnames of Scotland s.n. Malise, has Malis or Malisius in 1190 and 1210. The name is also listed in Reaney and Wilson, A Dictionary of English Surnames around the same time. We have changed the name to Malis der Totschläger to match the documentation." [Loar 09/2005, Atenveldt-A].”

MacClure is dated in 1526 with this spelling in Black, s.n. MacClure, p. 472.


Marina Sparling: NEW NAME

The name is English.
Marina is a feminine given name dated to 1575 as a christening name for Marina Brokingein Devon, England (Batch C05177-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:J3FW-CSS).
Sparling is a surname dated to 1575 in the marriage records for Katheryn Sparling in York, England (Batch M10851-3, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NVX4-1TP).
The client wants a female name and is most interested in he sound and spelling of the name; she will not accept Major changes to the name.


Mariona Galloway: NEW NAME and DEVICE
Sable, a dog passant, on a chief Or a stalk of wheat fesswise sable.

The name is English.
Mariona is a feminine given name dated to 1571 in the marriage record of Mariona Meade, Buckingham, England (Batch M10966-3, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJ13-FMK).
Galloway is a surname dated to 1566 in the marriage record of Phalix Galloway, York, England (Batch M01094-1 , https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NV4Y-QPJ).
The client wants a female name.


Matne Dona: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per bend sinister argent and vert, a stemless four-leafed clover and a skull facing to sinister counterchanged.


The name is Gaelic.

Matne is a masculine given name found in Book of Deer's and cited in “A Simple Guide to Constructing 12th Century Scottish Gaelic Names,” Sharon L. Krossa, http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/simplescotgaelicnames12.shtml. It is also cited as a male name in "A Simple Guide to Constructing 12th Century Scottish Gaelic Names," Effric neyn Kenyeoch vicralte (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/simplescotgaelicnames12.htm) and is a no-photocopy version of the same article cited for the given name.

Dona, “Unfortunate/Unlucky/Wretched,” is found in “Index of Names in Irish Annals: Masculine Descriptive Bynames,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Alpha.shtml#D. It is also dated to 1468 in Mari's "Index" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/DescriptiveBynames/Dona.shtml).


Meadhbh inghean Edwin: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per pale argent and vert, a sprig of three holly leaves counterchanged fructed gules.


Meadhbh is an Early Modern Irish Gaelic (c1200-c1700) feminine given name (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Meadhbh,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Meadhbh.shtml).

Edwin is an English masculine given name, dated to 1572 in a marriage record for Edwin Babington (Batch M00080-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5VT-KLB).

We're not sure how an English given name might fit here, if the inghean is dropped and Edwin treated as an unmarked patronymic or no. Blue Tyger comments that <inghean Edwin> improperly combines the Gaelic <inghean> with the English <Edwin> in a single name phrase, in violation of SENA PN.1.B.1. <Edwin> can be an unmarked patronymic in English. <Edwyn> is dated to 1546 and 1578 in Bardsley s.n. Edwin. I and y were used in interchangeably in English so this supports <Edwin>.

Michigane Jirou of the North: NEW NAME

The name is Japanese, and information comes from Academy of Saint Gabriel report 2019.

Michigane is a 16th C. nanori (“public” given name).

Jirou is a likely 16th C. yobina (“private” given name used by family or close associates). Construction usually follows the pattern <family name><yobina> <nanori>, but a family name isn't used here.

of the North is an English phrase, referring to Hokkaido. Is there a way that this might be translated into a family name, some of which were locatives?

The client desires a male name.


Pero Tercero: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Argent, a bearded and tonsured man dressed in brown monk's robes, maintaining a begging bowl and cup in his outstretched arms proper, on a chief gules three Latin crosses argent.


The name is Spanish.

Pero is a masculine given name dated to 1567 in the marriage record of Pero Basquez (Batch M87119-6, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FFLD-SMQ).

Tercero is a surname for the father of a child, Ana Tercero, baptised 1583 in Navarre (Batch C89567-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FRNP-QZH).


The client has the persona of a Franciscan monk. A possible blazon suggested Argent, a bearded Franciscan monk maintaining a begging bowl and a cup in his outstretched arms proper, on a chief gules three Latin Crosses argent. (Honestly, humans are a pain to blazon!)


Roan Feóirling: NAME RESUBMISSION from Laurel, August 2014, and NEW BADGE

Azure, a sea-lion erect argent and issuant from chief a demi-sun argent, eclipsed sable.


The client's previous name submission, Roan Feórna, was returned: “The Gaelic given name Roan has previously been ruled to be unregisterable: Submitted as Roan Mac Raith, Roan was documented from a translation of "a long geneology listed on pages 136-139 of The History of Ireland by Geoffrey Keating D.D. Volume II, The first book of the history from sect. XV to the end, edited with a translation and notes by Rev. Patrick S. Dinneen, M.A. London, published for the Irish texts society by David Nutt, 1908."...The person mentioned in the cited genealogy appears in the "Annals of the Four Masters", vol. 1, (http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100005A/) in the byname on Rotheachtaigh, mic Roain in entry M4170.1. This entry number indicates that the date referenced in this entry is approximately 4170 B.C., putting this reference well into legend rather than history. As no other evidence was found for Roan, it is not registerable. [Rónán Mac Raith, September 2002, A-Outlands]
The current submission documented this element as a character in a story about Saint Patrick. Under the literary name allowance (PN.1.B.2.d.2 of SENA), characters in lives of saints (who are not saints themselves) are only registerable if we have further evidence to show that such names were borrowed and used by ordinary people of that time and place. As we have no further documentation to justify this name in period, Roan is still not registerable as a Gaelic given name.”

Roan is dated to 1578 in a marriage record for Margaret Roan in London (Batch M05576-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NJ51-V6F). In late period England, surnames could serve as given names (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2012/09/12-09cl.html), and this is the case here. The header Feóirling is found in “16th & 17th Century Anglicized Irish Surnames from Woulfe,”Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/Woulfe/SortedByAnglicizedRoot_T.shtml, as the italicized Anglicized Irish form of Veerlin, p. 286. Veerlin is the dated name, but “this example provides reason to believe that the Gaelic form Feóirling was also in use at that time.” SENA Appendix A permits English and Gaelic elements to be combined as long as they are documented within 300 years (names in Woulfe appear in the Patent Rolls of James I dating to 1603-4). The client is most interested in the spelling of the name (as “Roan”) and will not accept Major changes to the name.


Shannon inghean uí Bhríain: DEVICE and BADGE RESUBMISSIONS from Laurel, June 2014

(device) Argent, on a bend embowed vert, a triquetra between two four-leafed clovers all palewise Or.

(badge) Argent, on a bend embowed vert a four-leafed clover palewise Or.


The name was registered June 2014.With the previous submissions, Argent, on a bend embowed to base vert, a triquetra between two four-leafed clovers all palewise Or. and Argent, on a bend embowed to base vert a four-leafed clover palewise Or., both were returned by Laurel: “...returned for presenting no evidence that embowing an ordinary to base is something that was done in period heraldry.”


Skúli Raza: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse, and elements are taken from “The Old Norse Name,” Geirr Bassi Haraldsson.

Skúli is a masculine given name, p. 14.

Raza is a byname, “arse,” p. 25. The client is most interested in the name (yes, “arse”...he was quite taken with it).


Terra of Burleigh: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Azure, a frog tergiant sustaining a drop spindle fesswise argent, a chief double-arched Or.


Terra is the client's legal given name, and she invoke SENA PN.1.B.2.e Legal Name Allowance (copy of DMV license provided to Laurel).

Burleigh is listed in the Domesday Book as a place in Sussex (the form in DB is Berchelie), http://www.domesdaybook.co.uk/sussex1.html; this spelling is found in 1642 (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Burleigh et al., p. 74).

She wants a female name and is most interested in the sound of the name.


The drop-spindle is a little close to the chief only because we were trying to increase the size of it to be sustained rather than maintained by the frog.


Theodora Akropolitina: NEW NAME

Theodora is a feminine given name dated to 1059 in “Personal Names of the Aristocracy in the Roman Empire During the Later Byzantine Era - Feminine Given Names,” Bardas Xiphias, http://heraldry.sca.org/names/byzantine/fem_given_names.html. Constantine Akropolites was a 13th C. scholar, found in “A Short (and rough) Guide to Byzantine Names for SCA Personae,” Hrolf Herjolfsson, http://ynysfawr.lochac.sca.org/files/pdf/Byzantine-Names.pdf. That source uses -a or -ina to feminize a family name. However, in Bardas' article, family names ending in -tes be femininized as -tissa, hence Akropolitissa, which is given as an example (http://heraldry.sca.org/names/byzantine/feminizing.html#feminizing_family_names). This might be more accurate, as Theodora is dated to the 9th C. This form is corroborated as Akropolitissa in” Prosopography of the Byzantine World: the second name Akropolites list shows Maria Akropolitissa, XI century, person number Maria 20122, Permalink: http://db.pbw.kcl.ac.uk/pbw2011/entity/person/154467

The client wants a female name and is most interested in the languge/culture of the name (Greek Byzantine).


Thomas Ward of Lancastreschire: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per pale sable and gules, a wolf rampant contourny and a skull, on a chief argent a sword fesswise gules.


The name is English.

Thomas is a male given name, dating from the DB 1086 (Withycombe, 3rd edition, 279-280).

Ward is an English surname, a header in R&W, 3rd edition, pp. 475-6. A Humphrie Ward has a christening date of 1519, in St. Martins, Tipton, Stafford, England, Batch C16744-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NYZ2-4SS.

Lancastreschire is dated to 1387 (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Lancashire, p. 270).


Tobias Wade: NEW NAME and DEVICE
Gyronny gules and Or, a fleur-de-lys azure.


The name is English.

Tobias is a male given name, seen as Tobias, the prior of Thoby Priory, c. 1142-1150 (R&W, 3rd edition, s.n.Tobey, Toby, Tobles, p. 449).

Wade is dated to 1162 as Gilbert Wade ( R&W, 3rd edition, s.n. Wade, Waide, pp. 470-1).

The client desires a male name.


Þorbiǫrn Bjarnyl: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Quarterly sable and Or, a (polar) bear's head erased contourny between two escarbuncles in bend argent.


The name is Old Norse, and elements are taken from “The Old Norse Name,” Geirr Bassi Haraldsson.

Þorbiǫrn is a masculine given name, p. 16.

Bjarnylr is a byname, “bear-warmth, able to remain warm in winter,” p. 20. An ON byname can be either capitalized or not.


Tristan Heley: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Or, three suns in pale gules between a pair of flaunches sable, each charged with a six-petaled rose argent.


The name is French and English.

Tristan is a masculine given name dated to 1587 in “Names from a 1587 Tax Roll from Provins,” Aryanhwy merch Catmael, http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/french/provins1587.html.

Heley is an English surname dated to 1576 in the marriage record for Margaret Heley, York, England (M00775-1, https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:N23R-1XJ).

The client desires a male name and is most interested in the sound and language/culture (Irish). He wishes it to be authentic for language culture (Irish). Hmmm.


William Devlin: NEW NAME

The name is English.

William is a male given name (Withycombe, 3rd edition, pg. 293, header entry); Henry Fitz William is dated to 1300 (Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, s.n. Williams).

Devlin is a header entry in R&W, p. 133. It is seen as Develyn in 1380; as an Irish name, it comes from Ó Dobhailein, “descendant of Dobhailen.”

The client wants a male name, is more interested in the culture/language (none cited) and will not accept Major changes to the name.



I was assisted in the preparation of this Letter of Intent by Alys Mackyntoich, Andreas von Meißen, Basil Dragonstrike, ffride wlffsdotter, Gawain of Miskbridge, Caoimhin McKee, Christian Jorgensen af Hilsonger, Illuminada Eugenia de Guadalupe y Godoy, Magnus von Lübeck, Maridonna Benvenuti, Rohese de Dinan, Seamus mac Riain and Vettorio Antonello.



There are 34 New Names, 2 New Name Changes, 21 New Device, 1 New Device Change, 7 New Badges, 1 Name Resubmission, 1 Resubmission Household Name, and 1 Device Resubmission. There are a total of 68 items, 65 of them new.





Thank you to those who have provided your great indulgence and patience, your expertise and your willingness to share it thus far, and to those who will do the same as this is presented to the College entire.



Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy
c/o Linda Miku
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atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com
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