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ATENVELDT COLLEGE OF HERALDS 30 March 2006, A.S. XL
Letter of Intent Kingdom of Atenveldt

Unto Elisabeth de Rossignol, Laurel; Margaret MacDuibhshithe, Pelican; Jeanne Marie Lacroix, Wreath; and the commenting Members of the College of Arms,

Greetings from Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, Parhelium Herald!

Estrella XXII Kudos and Appreciation: Thanks again to Seamus McDaid, Aten Principal Herald, for assuring that Heralds' Point was in a clean, well-lighted place; Daniel da Foria (lots of thanks) for reconfiguring the space so it was of maximum use (and for the sturdy, well-designed sign for Heralds' Point and for supervising Heralds' Point); and our intrepid consultants: our lovely and extraordinarily talented Laurel staff Elisabeth (Laurel herself!), Margaret (Pelican herself!), Jeanne Marie (Wreath herself!) and Shauna of Carrick Point (Ragged Staff herself!), Herveus d'Ormonde (Morsulus), and Symond Bayard le Gris; our Caidan cousins Honour Greneheart, James of the Lake, Su of the Silver Horn, and Illuminada; and Atenveldt comrades Seamus, Taran the Wayward, and Katherine of Throckmorton. If I've missed anyone, I do apologize, and if they'd like to come to Estrella XXIII and bring the omission up with me at that time, I'll humbly listen. (Watch out for those shackles, though...) Our workspace once again included a photocopier that made having clients fill out their paperwork (including all of the colored copies of armorial submissions) a reality - thanks to Otto Langhorn von Baden for trusting us with this very dependable piece of equipment.

The majority of these submissions come from the Estrella XXII Heraldic Consultation Table.

The Atenveldt College of Heralds requests the consideration and registration of the following names and armory with the College of Arms. Please note: Unless specifically stated, the submitter will accept any spelling and grammar corrections; all assistance is appreciated.

1. Adaleide de Warewic: NEW NAME

The name is English. Adelaide (undated) is found in Reaney and Wilson s.n. Adeline with the attested spelling and date of Adaleide 1107-13 ("Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames," Talan Gwynek, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/reaney/reaney.cgi?Adelaide ).

Warewic is dated to 1196, with Richard de Warewic (Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, s.n. Warwick).

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name and would like the name authentic as 12th-14th C. English.

2. Adelicia de Clare: NEW NAME

The name is English. Adelicia (1103-1151) is the name of the second queen of Henry I (Norah Lofts, Queens of England, Doubleday and Company, Garden City NY, 1977, p. 22).

Clare is found in Ekwall, referring to a "clayey slope" (p. 109, Clare O [Cleyore 1282 Ipm, Cl]. In Reaney and Wilson, there is a Richard Clare dated to 1317 and a Simon le Clayere in 1279; the latter name appears to be an occupational surname for a clayer. Between this byname for an occupation and Clare as a descriptor for a clay-rich region, de Clare is a reasonable locative byname.

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name.

3. Adelicia de Clare: NEW DEVICE

Gules, a dolphin haurient contourny between four seeblatter in cross Or.

4. Ainder ingen Demmáin: NEW NAME

The name is Irish Gaelic. Ainder is a feminine given name found in O Corrain and Maguire, s.n. Ainder, as the name of an early saint.

ingen is the Middle Gaelic feminine patronymic particle.

Demmán is an early pet-form of the masculine given name Diarmait; its most famous bearer was Demmán Mac Cairill (572) (OCM, s.n. Demmán). Demmáin is the expected genitive form (so says Margaret Makafee, Pelican).

5. Alexis De Vile: NEW NAME

Alexis is the name of a 5th C. male Roman saint, although this name is more common in the Eastern church than in the Western one (Withycombe, 3rd edition, p. 14). Albion voices concern that this saint might've been unknown to England in period, citing past precedent (mostly snipped) says: "Elena Glamorgan. Name...In this case, Flavia has been documented as a Roman saint. No evidence was provided, and none was found by the College, that an early saint named Flavia was known in the Middle Ages. Just as in the Sadok example above, we have no evidence that a Welsh, or even English, parent would have known of a saint named Flavia. If they did not know of a Saint Flavia, they could not have named a child for her in their language. Lacking references to one of these saints named Flavia in another language (such as Middle English), the name Flavia can only be considered as the (Roman) Latin name of a 1st and/or 6th C woman, and only appropriate for that language and time." [LoAR 06/2003, Atenveldt-A].

Although the English surname De Vile is not dated, a John Devile is noted in 1305, and there are a number of spelling variations, some from a locative origin, some as a nickname or pageant name (for "devil") in Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, p. 127, s.n. Davall.

The client is most interested in the sound of the name and doesn't care what gender it is. She requests it be authentic for time period but gives no specific one.

6. Alexis De Vile: NEW DEVICE

Or, a pithon displayed sable, winged gules.

Consider Ulvar van der Nederlanden: Or, a dragon sejant affronty wings displayed purpure. There is a CD for tincture and a CD for type or posture. There may be a possible RfS X.5 conflict, as posture can hide the number of legs that the dragon has in an affronty position, which is the key distinguishing feature between a pithon and a dragon.

7. Alyaa' Lyonnais: NEW NAME

The given name is Arabic. Alyaa' is found in A Dictionary of Muslim Names, Salahuddin Ahmed, s.n. Alyaa'; s.n. Alia suggests that it is the feminine form of Ali. 'Ali is given as a masculine given name (ism) in "Period Arabic Names and Naming Practices, "Da'ud ibn Auda ( http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/arabic-naming2.htm ), and the author suggests that a masculine name can be rendered into a feminine one by changing the terminal -i to -iyya (therefore 'Ali becomes 'Aliyya.).

The byname is French. Lyonnais is found in Dauzat s.n. Lyon, with "Lyonnais originaile de Lyon ou du Lyonnais".

The client is most interested in the sound of the name and that it is female in gender. Although documentation supports each separate element, we were unable to find precedent for an Arabic-French name in period; any insights would be appreciated.

8. Alyaa' Lyonnais: NEW DEVICE

Per saltire argent and sable, in pale a woman statant affronty, vested and arms upraised sable and an Arabic lamp vert.

9. Amélie de Quessenet: NEW NAME CHANGE from Ameline de Quessenet

The client's current name was registered July 2005. She wishes to change the given name.

Amélie is a French feminine given name (p. 19, Withycombe, 3rd edition, s.n. Amelia).

The client will not accept major or minor changes to the submission. If registered, the currently-registered name is to be released.

10. Amicia Theudoric la Sauniere: ACCEPTANCE OF TRANSFER of two badges and Household Name

The personal name was registered April 2005. The client is accepting from Caterina Amiranda della Quercia (listed below) two badges, (fieldless) In pale a demi-dragon contourny sable issuant from a tankard reversed argent., and Azure, three tankards and on a chief argent a dragon passant sable., in addition to the registered household name, House Flagon and Dragon. A letter of acceptance is forwarded to Laurel.

11. Amleth Rønebek: NEW NAME

The name is Danish. Amleth is found s.n. Amlothi in Danmarks Gamle Personnavne I. Fornavne, by Gunnar Knudsen, Marius Kristensen and Rikard Hornby (Copenhagen, Dansk Historisk Handbogsforlag, 1979-80). Amlothi appears to be a masculine given name; Amleth is masculine as well, related to Hamlet. No dates were given for Amleth, but the citation of the work from where it was taken is Annales Danici medii ævi, Ellen Jorgensen, Copenhagen, 1920; medii ævi strikes me as meaning "Middle Ages." Additionally, Latinized forms of Amleth are noted (Amlethus, Amletus) which suggest that the name might have a period basis, with it being as likely found in records listed in Latin as in Danish.

Rønebek is a byname dated to c. 1330, s.n. Rinebek in Danmarks Gamle Personnavne II. Tilnavne, same authors.

The client is most interested in the sound of the name and doesn't care about the gender; she wishes it authentic for language/culture (although which language/culture is not mentioned); and she will not accept minor changes to the submission.

12. Atenveldt, Kingdom of: NEW ORDER NAME for the Order of Atlas

The name is English. Atlas was one of the 12 Titans in Greek mythology, who in an abortive attempt to take over the universe (isn't that always the case? Titans...Bond villains...Pinky and the Brain...), was punished by being forced to hold the heavens upon his shoulders

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Atlas_%28mythology%29 ). The term Atlas also enters the English language in 1589 (and is cited again in 1618) as a term for "one who supports or sustains a great burden; a chief supporter; a mainstay," according to the Compact Oxford English Dictionary.

The College of Arms permits an Order to use the name of a non-Christian god, demi-gods and saints as per the Cover Letter for the August 2005 LoAR; the use of such a name is one step from period practice.

13. Atenveldt, Kingdom of: NEW ORDER NAME AND BADGE, Order of Atlas

Azure, a man in a short tunic kneeling on one knee argent, sustaining on his shoulders a sun, a bordure indented Or.

The blazon follows the example of Duncan Alaric MacDonald, registered September 2002: (Fieldless) A man kneeling on one knee contourny proper garbed argent crined sable and maintaining an open book Or.

14. Atenveldt, Kingdom of: ORDER NAME RESUBMISSION from Laurel, August 2003, for Order of the Beacon of the Desert

The previous submission, Order of the Radiant Servants, was returned for no documentation demonstrating that the name follows a period pattern of order names as required by RfS III.2.b.ii, which states in part that "Names of orders and awards must follow the patterns of the names of period orders and awards."

Meradudd Cethin's "Project Ordensnamen" ( http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/order/ ) dates the order name

Star of the Noble House to 1351. This shows one example of a period order name constructed as [Item] of [Generic toponymic]. There are many period order names constructed as [Item] of [Placename] and many generic toponymics

used in order names (most famously Temple and Hospital). Therefore, order names in the pattern [Item] of [Generic toponymic] are registerable, assuming that the item and generic toponymic are appropriate.

This also follows the pattern of the Order of the Star of the Desert and the Order of the Pilgrim of the Desert, both registered to the Kingdom of Atenveldt in August 2003. The designator avoids conflict with the title Beacon Principal Herald and the Award of the Coill's Guiding Beacon.

15. Atenveldt, Kingdom of: ORDER NAME RESUBMISSION from Laurel, December 2002, for Order of Fenris

The original Order name, Order of the Blood of Fenris, was returned because no documentation was presented or found that the name followed a pattern of order names used in period as required by RfS III.2.b.ii. The only period order mentioned was the Order of the Golden Fleece. "This example does not support an order name Order of the Blood of [mythical creature]. Orle found a reference to an order name dated to 1608 that includes the word Blood: Van Duren page 643 gives Order of the Precious Blood 1608 Mantua. This is the only reference I could find for blood being used in a period order. As is common with religious orders it refers to Christ. We do not find specific beings from mythology as order names. Fenris is basically a demigod from Norse tradition. As Order of the Precious Blood is a reference to Jesus, it is not support for use of Blood of [mythical creature] in an order name. Lacking evidence that Order of the Blood of Fenris follows a construction used for order names in period, it is not registerable." The College of Arms now permits an Order to use the name of a non-Christian god, demi-gods and saints as per the Cover Letter for the August 2005 LoAR; the use of such a name is one step from period practice.

In Norse mythology, the Fenrisulfr, Wolf of Fenrir, Fenris or simply Fenrir is a monstrous wolf, the son of Loki and the giantess Angrboða

( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fenris ).

If registered, this Order name is to be associated with the registered badge (fieldless) A wolf passant argent goutty de sang.

16. Caterina Amiranda della Quercia: TRANSFER of two badges and Household Name

The personal name was registered March 1999. The client is transferring two badges, (fieldless) In pale a demi-dragon contourny sable issuant from a tankard reversed argent., and Azure, three tankards and on a chief argent a dragon passant sable., in addition to the registered household name, House Flagon and Dragon, to Amicia Theudoric la Sauniere. A letter of transfer is forwarded to Laurel.

17. Caterina Amiranda della Quercia: BADGE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, November 2005

(fieldless) A dragonfly within and conjoined to an annulet sable.

The name was registered March 1999.

The previous submission, identical to this, was returned by the CoA for exceeding the number of armorial registrations allowed an individual: the Administrative Handbook, section I.B, limits individuals to four pieces of armory. The client is transferring two badges and a household name to Amicia Theudoric la Sauniere, allowing the registration of this badge.

18. Cécile de Brétigny: NEW BADGE

(fieldless) A unicorn passant contourny gules.

The name was registered September 2005.

19. Cristíona Cinnicéid: NEW NAME

The name is Irish Gaelic, with both elements found in Woulfe, Irish Names and Surnames. Cristíona is a feminine given name, p. 209. Albion notes that Woulfe is not reliable for his given names; he does not discriminate between modern forms and medieval forms (Precedent from 5/2005 for Morin inghean ui Mhuirneachain); she notes that "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Feminine Names," Mari Elspeth nic Bryan

( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/index.html ) has Cristina 1268, 1269, 1270.

Cinnicéad is shown as a header on p. 235, with the entry as "Kincaid, Kinkead." MacLysaght s.n. Kincaid states "This Scottish toponymic had become well established in several northern counties by mid-seventeenth century." Black s.n. Kincaid has <de Kyncade> 1450, 1467, 1493, <de Kynkad> 1457, <Kyncayd> 1545, <Kyncaide> 1550, <Kincaid> 1609, <Kinkaid> 1547, <Kyncaid> 1510, <Kynked> 1493; he gives no Gaelic forms. Albion suggests that barring evidence that <Cinnicéid> is a period Gaelic form of the surname, Cristine Kincaid would be a reasonable 15th C Scots name; with Cristine dated to 1462 in Black s.n. Wright. (Cristina would be closer to the sound of the submission name, however.)

No "boxes of doom" were marked on the name submission forms.

20. Cristíona Cinnicéid: NEW DEVICE

Ermine, a catamount rampant azure charged upon the shoulder with a decrescent argent.

This is clear of Catherine Winifred of Tor Bitterroot, Ermine, a domestic cat sejant affronty azure, orbed Or, with one CD for the posture of the cat, and another for adding the decrescent, and it's clear of Will Langdon of Greymorne, Ermine, a lion rampant to sinister azure., with one CD for the posture and one for adding the decrescent.

21. Dana the Unredy: NEW DEVICE

Azure, in pale two dolphins haurient in fess and two dolphins haurient contourny in fess, in base a mullet argent.

The name was registered October 2005.

22. Daniel de Foria: REQUEST FOR RECONSIDERATION from Daniel da Forio, Laurel, July 2005

The original submission, Daniel de Foria, was registered as Daniel da Forio, as no documentation was submitted and none found to demonstrate that Italian bynames were formed from street names in period or that Foria is a period word. However, there does appear to be region in Napoli called Forio, and the name was changed to reflect this.

The client evidently provided documentation with his original submission that was mislaid along the way and he provides new copies for it. de Foria is found as an Italian surname in a list of more than 1800 surnames for individuals of the Valle di Sangro in 1447; the listing was compiled by N. F. Faraglia and published in 1898 as an essay, "Numerazione dei Fuochi della Valle del Sangro." This work was the result of Faraglia's research in books left as a result of 1443 King of Naples Alfonso I of Aragona's ordering of a tax reform in the 15th C. and a subsequent census of the region in 1447, the books of the Valle di Sangro and another for Calabria Ulteriore. Only the first seems to have survived to Faraglia's time

( http://www.abruzzoheritage.com/magazine/2002_06/d.htm#d ).

The client provides another citation for a location called Foria. The Greeks' founding of Naples occurred between the 9th and 7th centuries BC, and the form of the early town was heavily influenced by the rivers, valleys, hills and swamps that made the area convoluted. One of the two valleys that created a natural barrier around the coastal areas is the Via Foria, both of which were likely to offer space and resources for "urban" development. ("Greek Naples: Two Tales of One City," David Taylor, http://faculty.ed.umuc.edu/~jmatthew/naples/Greek_Naples.html ). While Naples came under Roman rule and influence, a long-time named region may have maintained its name, even with speakers of a different language.

23. Diamante Pellegrini: NEW NAME

The name is Italian. Diamante is found in De Felice's Dizionario dei Nomi Italiani, p. 126; it is also listed as a feminine given name in "Feminine Given Names from Thirteenth Century Perugia," Arval Benicoeur ( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/arval/perugia/ ).

Pellegrini is found in De Felice's Dizionario dei Cognomi Italiani, p. 191. It is also found twice in "Italian names from Imola, 1312," Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/italian/imola.html).

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name; she will not accept major changes to the submission.

24. Dobronyi Erzbet: NEW NAME CHANGE from Elspeth Flannagann

The name is Hungarian. Dobronyi is the client's legal birth surname; a photocopy of her driver's license is forwarded to Laurel.

The given name is stated to be the Hungarian form of Elizabeth. Erzsébet is cited as one of the most popular feminine given names in 16th C. Hungary ("Hungarian Feminine Names," Walraven van Nijmegen, http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/names/magfem2.html ); this citation also has a number of pre-1600 variations (including Elisabeta, Elizabet, Elyzabeth and Ersebet, but not this particular one), so we hope this isn't too far afield. I found a reference to St. Erzbet (church) in Esztergom, Hungary, online ( http://www.pbase.com/ralf/image/43374159 ).

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name and will not accept major changes to the submission.

If registered, her currently-registered name should be retained as an alternate name.

25. Domingo Marín de León: NEW DEVICE CHANGE

Per pale gules and azure, two suns and a lion statant Or.

The name was registered September 1994.

If registered, his currently-held device, Per bend sinister azure and Or, a lion's head Or and a sun azure charged with a decrescent Or., should be retained as a badge.

26. Dougal MacNeil: NEW NAME

The spelling of the given name isn't dated in Black, although Dugal (canon of Dunblane) and Dugall (thane of Molen) are cited as 13th C. spellings (p. 217, s.n. Dougal).

This form of MacNeil isn't dated in Black, although MacNeill is dated to 1329 (p. 550, Black, s.n. MacNeil).

The client is most interested in language/culture of the name and wishes the name authentic for 11th C. Scots Gaelic; he will not accept major changes to the name.

27. Dougal MacNeil: NEW DEVICE

Per pale sable and vert, two wolves combattant argent maintaining between them a goblet Or, a bordure argent semy of Maltese crosses sable.

28. Einar Andersson: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, June 2004

Sable, on a bend cotised between a drakkar reversed and a tankard Or a sword gules.

The name was registered June 2004.

The original submission, Sable, on a bend cotised Or a sword gules., was returned for conflict with Richard Ericksson, the Burgundian Norseman: Sable, on a bend cotised Or a castle palewise and a hurst of three pine trees palewise sable.

29. Eyv{o,}r Halldórsdóttir: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse, with all elements found in Geirr Bassi Haraldson's The Old Norse Name. Eyv{oł}r is a feminine given name on p. 9, and Halldórr is a masculine given name on p. 10.

This appears to be the correct way to form a patronymic, according to the guidelines on p. 17.

The client is most interested in the sound and language/culture of the name.

30. Eyv{o,}r Halldórsdóttir: NEW DEVICE

Argent, a horse passant and a chief azure.

31. Fabio Ventura: NEW NAME

The name is Italian. Fabio Glissenti, a late 16th C. Venetian physician, was most noted for his 1596 book Discorsi morali contra il dispiacer del morire, detto Athanatophilia (Moral Discourses Against the Displeasure of Dying); Glissenti's work was based on the Platonic tradition and addressed death in a humanistic manner

( http://www.findarticles.com/p/articles/mi_hb3394/is_199803/ai_n8140484 ). Fabio Chigi, born at Sienna in 1599 and died at Rome in 1667, was elected Pope in 1655 and is known as Alexander VII

( http://www.newadvent.org/cathen/01294a.htm ).

Ventura is found as a surname taken from the Catasto of 1427, in "Italian Renaissance Men's Names," Ferrante LaVolpe ( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/ferrante/catasto/ ).

The client is most interested in the given name.

32. Fabio Ventura: NEW DEVICE

Per chevron sable and purpure, in chief two wedges of cheese and in base three goblets conjoined in pall, bases to center Or.

33. Flòraidh Tay: NEW NAME CHANGE from Katherine Lamond

Flòraidh is said by the client to be Gaelic for "flower," and the Gaelic form of the English feminine given name Flora (which Withycombe notes as more of a French name than English, at least in period). Florie is seen as a period given name in "A List of Feminine Personal Names Found in Scottish Records," Talan Gwynek (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/scottishfem/scottishfem.html ), dated to 1190-1220 and againin 1567. It has been registered by the CoA with this spelling (Floraidh nic Alasdair, August 1990).

The Tay is a river in Scotland, the longest in the United Kingdom ( http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/River_Tay ); it has been registered, without the preposition "of," to her husband Malcolm Tay (February 2000).

Her current name was registered in June 1995; if the name change is registered, her old name should be retained as an alternate name.

34. Garrett Fitzpatrick: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, April 2003

Per chevron vert and argent, three annulets counterchanged.

The name was registered April 2003.

The original submission, Vert, a chevron between three cats statant argent., was returned for multiple conflicts; this is a complete redesign.

35. German Schade: NEW NAME CHANGE from Jiruad Saint Germain

The currently-held name was registered June 1998.

The name change is German. German is demonstrated as a masculine given name in "German Names from 1495," Aryanhwy merch Catmael ( http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/german1495.html ).

Schade is a surname in the same article ( http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/surnames1495.html ). The client is most interested in the name being authentic for language/culture; although this isn't elaborated upon, this seems to be a solid very late 15th C. German name.

If registered, his currently-registered name should be retained as an alternate name.

36. Hákon mj{oł}ksiglandi: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse, with all elements found in Geirr Bassi Haraldson's The Old Norse Name. Hákon is a masculine given name found on p. 11; the byname, meaning "much-sailing, far-traveling," is found on p. 26.

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name; he will not accept major changes to the submission.

37. Hákon mj{oł}ksiglandi: NEW DEVICE

Gules, a seahorse erect contourny and on a chief indented argent three anchors azure.

38. Ingvarr h{oł}ggvandi Ósvaldsson: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse, with all elements found in Geirr Bassi Haraldson's The Old Norse Name. Ingvarr and Ósvaldr are masculine given names, found on p. 12 and p. 14 respectively. This appears to be the correct way to form a patronymic, according to the guidelines on p. 17.

h{oł}ggvandi is an epithet meaning "hewer, headsman," p. 23.

The client is most interested in the sound of the name; he will not accept major changes to the submission.

39. Jennifer Trethewy: NEW NAME

Jennifer is the client's legal given name. While it is a modern English feminine given name, Withycombe notes that it survived as Jennifer (from the original Welsh Guenevere) in Cornwall to modern times (Withycombe, 3rd edition, pp. 140-1, s.n. Gwenevere).

Trethewy is dated to 1297 with Henry de Trethewy; the name comes from Trethewey (Cornwall), cited in Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, p. 454, s.n. Trethewy.

The client is most interested in the sound of the name and wishes it authentic for pre-16th C. Cornwall.

40. Jennifer Trethewy: NEW DEVICE

Argent, on a bend sinister vert between an inkwell and a quill pen bendwise sinister sable, three gouttes d'Or.

41. Johan of Hawksley: NEW DEVICE

Per fess embattled argent and Or, three bows drawn and armed with arrows in fess and a hawk striking contourny sable.

The name was registered June 2004.

42. Johan of Hawksley: NEW BADGE

Or, in pale three bows drawn and armed with arrows in chevron and a hawk striking contourny sable.

The name was registered June 2004.

43. Johann Wolfgang von Hesse: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, April 2000

Gules, three wolves' teeth issuant from sinister Or, a tierce bendy sinister sable and Or.

The name was registered February 1999.

The previous submission, Argent, a cross quadrate formy fitchy, a chief dovetailed sable., was returned for conflict. This is a complete redesign.

44. John Fair of Hawkwode: NEW NAME

The name is English. John is a masculine given name, fairly common in the 12th-15th Centuries (Withycombe, 3rd edition, pp. 178-9).

Fair is an English surname, dated to 1203 with Johannes filus Fair (Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, s.n. Fair).

Hawkwode is dated to 1343 with John de Haukwode and 1351 with John de Hawkwood (this might be the same individual, but it demonstrates the variant spelling possibilities with the name), found in Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, s.n. Hawkwood.

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name and would like it authentic for 11th-14th Century England.

45. Jonathon von Trotha and Deille of Farnham: NEW BADGE, for House Astrum Aureum

Per pale sable and gules, a compass rose Or within an orle of mullets argent.

The clients' personal names were registered June 1995 and July 1999 respectively; the household name was registered jointly to them January 2004.

46. Juan Diego Drago: NEW NAME

The name is Spanish. Both Juan and Diego are masculine given names found in "Spanish Names from the Late 15th Century," Juliana de Luna ( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/isabella/surnames.html ).

Drago is cited as a common Portugese surname in "Portuguese Names from the 16th Century, Letters from the Court of King John III," Juliana de Luna ( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/juliana/portugal16/ ).

The client will not accept major changes to the submission. According to Albion, the use of double given names is rare, but found in Spain in the 16th C.

46. Katharina von Marburg: NEW DEVICE

Per bend gules and sable, on a bend Or three griffins segreant palewise sable.

The name appears in the January 2006 Atenveldt Letter of Intent.

47. Kathleen O'Farrell: NEW NAME

Kathleen is the client's legal middle name (documentation included). It has also been ruled SCA-compatible in the Cover Letter for the March 2002 LoAR. Withycombe notes that the Irish Kathleen is derived from ME Catlin (pp. 186, Withycombe, 3rd edition, s.n. Katharine).

(O) Farrell is found as a header (undated) in MacLysaght's The Surnames of Ireland (6th edition, p. 104). Albion suggested that based on Woulfe s.n. {O'} Fearghail has <O Ferrall> dated to Elizabeth I - James I., the name might be improved with the spelling as O'Ferrall. The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name; she will not accept major changes to the submission.

48. Kathleen O'Farrell: NEW DEVICE

Per bend sinister sable and vert, a mullet of seven points and an owl argent.

49. Kiera O'Malley: NAME RESUBMISSION from Laurel, September 1994

The original name submission, Cyra Shea O'Malley, was returned for the following reasons: "Cyra is not a feminine form of Cyrus, which seems never to have developed a feminine form. The closest anyone could suggest to the given is Kiera, registered in 1992 on the basis of a listing in Butler's Lives of the Saints for a female Irish saint Kiara circa 680. This may be as close as we can come with a name that is culturally compatible with the surnames, but was a greater change than we thought we could reasonably make without consulting the submitter. A second difficulty is the overall formation of the name. The Irish in period do not use double surnames (or double given names, for that matter). Kiera O'Malley would be unproblematical. Palimpsest also suggested Ciara ségda Ó Máille."

The client will accept the College's recommendation; she is most interested in the sound of the name.

Albion doubts that a Laurel ruling from 1994 is going to be sufficient on its own for registration. She suggests that perhaps this can be changed it necessary to Ceara, the early modern form of Cera (OCM s.n. Cera note three virgin saints). Woulfe s.n. Ó Máille has several English forms from temp. Elizabeth I - James I, including O Mally, so Ceara O'Mally would be registerable with just one weirdness for combining Gaelic and anglicized Irish.

50. Léot MacGregor: NEW NAME

The name is Scots Gaelic. Léot is a masculine given name from The Book of Deer, cited in "A Simple Guide to Constructing 12th Century Scottish Gaelic Names," Sharon L. Krossa

( http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/simplescotgaelicnames12.shtml ); Léot with the abbot of Brechin, and the name is dated 1130-1150 A.D.

MacGregor is found in "Names from Papers Relating to the Murder of the Laird of Calder," Margaret Makafee

( http://www.contrib.andrew.cmu.edu/~grm/calder.html ), dated 1591-1596.

The client is most interested in the sound of the name and wishes it to be authentic for Scottish Gaelic.

51. Léot MacGregor: NEW DEVICE

Gules, in pale three bones in fess and an escarbuncle argent.

52. Léot MacGregor: NEW BADGE

Gules, three bones in fess argent.

53. Malachie Cannan: NEW NAME

Malachie is a Biblical name found in Morlet, Dictionnaire etymologique des Noms de Famille, p. 653. Withycombe, discussing it as an masculine given name, notes that it (as Malachi) wasn't found in England until after the Reformation, but that Malachy is common in Ireland, representing the Irish saint name Maelaghlin (3rd edition, p. 204). "Dated Names Found in Ó Corráin & Maguire's Irish Names," Mari Elspeth nic Bryan

( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/ocm/OCM-MasGivAlpha2s.html ) shows Malachy in 890 and comments that this seems to be the Anglicized spelling.

Cannan is found in Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, p. 82, from the Irish Gaelic meaning "son of Cannanan".

The client is most interested in the meaning of the name, and wishes it authentic for time period and language/culture of 15th-17th C. Scottish/Irish.

54. Malachie Cannan: NEW DEVICE

Gules, a sheaf of three swords within an orle Or.

55. Marion Ross: NEW DEVICE

Argent, in pale a horse salient azure and a demi-sun issuant from base sable.

The name was registered September 2003.

56. Marion Ross: NEW BADGE

(fieldless) A demi-horse salient azure.

The name was registered September 2003.

57. Mathias Haubrich: NEW NAME

The name is German. Mathias is a masculine given name found in Historiisches Deutches Vornamenbuch, V. 3, p. 262, s.n. Matthias. It is also found in "German Names from 1495," Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/german/german1495.html).

Haubrich the is the client's legal given name (documentation provided to Laurel).

58. Mathias Haubrich: NEW DEVICE

Per chevron checky vert and Or, and vert, a chevron argent and in base a cross potent Or.

59. Merrick Dowling: NEW NAME

MacLysaght shows Merrick as a 12th C. Welsh name in Connacht, used occasionally as an English name (6th edition, p. 215, s.n. Merrick). Talan shows Merricke as a masculine given name from the Welsh Meurig ("Late Sixteenth Century Welsh Names," http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/talanWelsh16.html ).

Dowling is cited as the Anglicized form of the Irish family name Ó Dúnlaing (MacLysaght, 6th edition, p. 89, s.n. (O) Dowling). This seems to be reasonable as a late period name.

Welsh and Anglicized Irish have been deemed registerable, although one step from period practice (Ryan de Caergybi, A-Outlands 05/03).

The client is most interested in the sound of the name.

60. Michael mac Tigernaich: NEW NAME

Michael is the client's legal given name (attested by Jeanne Marie, Wreath, and Herveus, Morsulus).

The byname is Irish Gaelic, found in "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland," Heather Rose Jones ( http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/tangwystyl/irish100/ ). The nominative form is Tigernach.

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name.

61. Michael mac Tigernaich: NEW DEVICE

Quarterly azure and argent, an enfield rampant Or and a bordure counterchanged.

62. Orlaith Bradden: NEW NAME

The name is Irish Gaelic. Órlaith is a feminine given name of the 12th C. ("Dated Names Found in Ó Corráin & Maguire's Irish Names," Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/ocm/ ).

Bradden is found in MacLysaght (6th edition, p. 264, s.n. Salmon).

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name, and the desired gender is female; she will not accept major changes to the submission.

63. Remus Xenos: NEW NAME

Remus is the name of one of the twin founders of Rome; as babies, he and his brother Romulus were exposed and left to die, only to be raised by a she-wolf. He is mentioned by Ovid, which would date the literary appeance of this individual to the time of the Roman Republic (Lempriere's Classical Dictionary of Proper Names mentioned the Ancient Authors Writ Large, 3rd edition, Routledge and Kegan Paul, NY, s.n. Remus). It is mentioned in De Felice's Nomi under s.n. Remo, etymology unknown. It is also found as a Jewish name in Rome in the 1550s, in "Sabato Calabrese Remus of Foffi" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/yehoshua/rome_names.html ).

Xenos is the Greek term for "stranger, foreigner" ( http://www.kypros.org/cgi-bin/lexicon/ ). Xenos is found as a masculine given name in "Early 14th C. Byzantine Names of Macedonia," Maridonna Benvenuti

( http://www.maridonna.com/onomastics/macedonia.htm ); it might be possible to construct a patronym from it.

The client's only comment on the forms is that he believes the name to mean "Remus the Stranger."

64. Remus Xenos: NEW DEVICE

Per saltire sable and argent, a mask of tragedy and a mask of comedy vert, ribboned gules.

65. Rígán mac Ferchair: NEW NAME

The name is Irish Gaelic. Rígán is an early period masculine given name (OCM, p. 155).

mac is the Gaelic masculine patronymic particle, "son of."

Ferchar is an early period masculine given name (OCM, p. 96); Ferchair is the expected patronymic/genitive form ("Index of Names in Irish Annals: Ferchar," Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Ferchar.shtml ).

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name.

66. Rígán mac Ferchair: NEW NAME

Argent, two dragons combattant and a dragon passant, all sable, winged, bellied and breathing flames gules.

67. Robert William Makintoshe: NEW NAME

Robert and William are masculine given names, both introduced into England with the Normans, both found in Withycombe, 3rd edition, on p. 118 and p. 135 respectively.

Makintoshe is dated to 1544 in Black, pp. 518-9 s.n. Macintosh.

The client is most interested in the sound of the name; he wishes it authentic for language/culture (none given); he will not accept major changes to the submission.

68. Robert William Makintoshe: NEW DEVICE

Per chevron Or and azure, two apples gules, slipped and leaved vert, and an eagle rising contourny, wings elevated and addorsed, Or.

69. Rolant Richolf von dem Reyne: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, June 2004

Purpure, a chevron rompu between a seeblatt inverted, a seeblatt and a dog's head couped argent, collared Or.

The name was registered June 2004.

The original submission, Purpure, a chevron rompu between a seeblatt inverted, a seeblatt and a dog's head couped collared argent., was returned for conflict with Erin of Rencester: Purpure, a chevron rompu between two mullets and a dumbeg argent. There is a single CD for the change of type of the secondary charges. Questions were raised in commentary about the tincture of the dog's collar. If the collar were of a contrasting tincture that had been inadvertently omitted from the blazon, that would yield a second CD for adding a tertiary charge. On the full-color emblazon, the collar is indeed argent, and as such it is effectively nothing more than an artistic variation of the argent head, worth no difference. The client has made the collar Or, so that the second CD can be attained for adding a tertiary charge.

70. Romanus Rodrigo: NEW DEVICE

Per pale azure and argent, two double-bitted axes counterchanged.

The name appears in the 6 January 2006 Atenveldt Letter of Intent.

71. Sarra Garrett: NEW NAME

The name is English. Sarra is found as a feminine English given name in the Curia Rolls 1189-1215 and again in 1316 (pp. 263-4, Withycombe, 3rd edition, s.n. Sara(h).

Garrett is an English family name, with this spelling dated 1533-5 (pp. 184-5, Reaney and Wilson, 3rd edition, s.n. Garrett).

72. Sarra Garrett: NEW DEVICE

Or, an oak sprig fesswise proper and a chief gules.

73. Snorri inn hávi: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse. Snorri is a popular masculine given ON name found in "Viking Names found in the Landnámabók," Aryanhwy merch Catmael (http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/landnamabok.html ).

The byname, a period ON term for "tall, impressive," is found in "Viking Bynames found in the Landnámabók," Aryanhwy merch Catmael ( http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/norse/vikbynames.html ).

74. Temurmaghad Ghubiyan: NAME RESUBMISSION from Laurel, April 2004

The original name submission Temur Khana was returned for conflict with Temur Khan, grandson of Kublai Khan and an Emperor of China, with his own entry in Britannica Online. Although the names do not have the same meaning, they are nearly identical in sound and appearance. Just as the CoA would protect the names of kings of European kingdoms, it is appropriate to protect the names of Chinese emperors.

The name is Mongolian. The given name Temurmaghad means "iron determination/resolve." The byname Ghubiyan means "ravenous, starving." The individual elements can be found at Lingua Mongolia: Classical Mongolian Grammar and Tutorials ( http://www.linguamongolia.co.uk/searchdict.html ), with copies of appropriate entries to Laurel. The given name follows a pattern for names that reflect desirable qualities in life and that represent characteristics of strength, durability or physical value, as outlined in "Mongolian Naming Practices," Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy. 1995 KWHS Proceedings.

The byname follows descriptives, often physical, that apply to the individual (similar to bujir, "dirty, filthy," and targhutai: "fat, 'fatty'").

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name and the meaning.

75. Temurmaghad Ghubiyan: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, April 2004

Gules, a ram's head erased within nine lozenges in annulo argent.

The original device submission, Gules, a ram's head erased within nine lozenges in annulo argent. (With the lozenges oriented outward, like the petals of a flowers), was returned because no adequate blazon could be found for the position of the lozenges, violating RfS VII.7.b: "Elements must be reconstructible in a recognizable form from a competent blazon.... elements that cannot be described in such a way that the depiction of the armory will remain consistent may not be used." The submitted blazon would result in all the lozenges being palewise, which does not match the emblazon. The resubmission orients the lozenges in the manner that the device could be constructed from the blazon alone.

(Although the inclusion of a specific number of charges in the semy might be a matter of artistic license, nine is the lucky number among the Mongol; seven is extraordinarily unlucky.)

76. Thorarna I Hiartt: NEW NAME

Thorarna is a feminine given name found in Geirr Bassi Haraldsson's The Old Norse Name, p. 16 (as Þórarna).

The byname is intended to refer to a farm in northern Norway.

The client will not accept major changes to the submission.

77. Thorarna I Hiartt: NEW DEVICE

Quarterly argent and vert, a Bowen knot set crosswise counterchanged.

78. Titus Antonius Agrippa Romanees: NEW NAME

The name is Latin/Roman. From the Nova Roma website ( http://www.novaroma.org/via_romana/names.html ), the name is constructed in the classical three-part name, and the first three elements are found there.

Titus is a praenomen (one of the handful used in the Roman Republic and Empire), Antontius is a nomen, and Agrippa is a cognomen ("he who was born feet first").

Romanees is an agnomen, a "nickname" or epithet, that unlike a cognomen is bestowed directly on the individual rather than carried over from father to son. The client's original submission, Antonius Agrippa Romanees, lacked a praenomen, which he has selected, and believes that Romanees is a term that reflects his military service or presence in Rome.

I don't recall ever seeing a Latin word with a double -e-, so I hope someone might be able to justify this or suggest a term similar in sound to this. The client is most interested in the sound and language/culture of the name.

79. Titus Antonius Agrippa Romanees: NEW DEVICE

Sable, in pale a capital letter P Or and two lightning bolts crossed in saltire argent.

The client believes that the letter P was a symbol of the Roman Praetorian Guard; I've only been able to find the scorpion as a symbol for the Praetorians (the astrological sign of the emperor Tiberius, a staunch advocate of the group); any help in confirming this would be appreciated, although such information isn't needed for the armory to be registered.

Consider Kalven the Deranged: Sable, issuant from sinister chief a lightning bolt bendwise sinister argent conjoining in dexter base an estoile of four greater and four lesser rays Or.

80. Ulbrecht vom Walde: DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, April 2003

Per fess Or and vert, three trees eradicated in fess and two lozenges in fess counterchanged.

The name was registered April 2003.

The original submission, Purpure, on a lozenge Or a tree eradicated vert., was returned for conflict. This is a redesign.

81. Valbj{oł}rn Hrútsson: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse, with all elements in Geirr Bassi Haraldsson's The Old Norse Name. Valbj{oł}rn and Hrútr masculine given names, p. 15 and p. 11 respectively. This appears to be the correct way to form a patronymic, according to the guidelines on p. 17.

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name.

82. Vallaúlfr Rurikson: NEW BADGE

Azure, two wolves dormant respectant and on a chief indented argent a mullet azure.

83. Vallaúlfr Rurikson and Cécile de Brétigny: NEW JOINTLY-HELD BADGE

Per pale indented azure and argent, a wolf argent and a unicorn gules combattant, both gorged and chained Or.

The names were registered January 2005 and September 2005 respectively.

The elements are taken from the clients' devices.

84. Vikarr feilan: NEW NAME

The name is Old Norse, with all elements in Geirr Bassi Haraldsson's The Old Norse Name. Vikarr is a masculine given name, p. 16.

feilan is an epithet meaning "wolf-cub," p. 21.

The client will not accept major changes to the submission.

85. Violet Elliott: NEW NAME

Violet is a feminine given name found in "Names of women mentioned in the Perth Guildry Book 1464-1598," Aryanhwy merch Catmael ( http://www.ellipsis.cx/~liana/names/scots/perth.html ); it is found 13 times between 1545 and 1587.

Elliott is a Scottish surname, undated (Black, The Surnames of Scotland, pp. 242-3, s.n. Elliot).

The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name and wishes it to be authentic for language/culture in Scottish; she will not accept major changes to the submission.

86. Violet Elliott: NEW DEVICE

Argent, a bee statant proper atop a violet, a bordure purpure.

87. Yngvarr Ottoson: NEW NAME

Ingvarr is found in Geirr Bassi Haraldson's The Old Norse Name as a masculine given name, p. 12. While the submitted spelling is not found in this source, it has been registered with the Y- spelling as recently as January 2000 (Yngvarr Feilan Rauðúlfsson). Otto appears to be a Germanic rather than a Norse name (from Odo), but Geirr Bassi notes Ótta as a masculine given name, p.14, which would be Óttuson in its patronymic form. The client is most interested in the language/culture of the name and wishes it to be authentic for Norse, so Óttuson might be more appropriate.

88. Yngvarr Ottoson: NEW DEVICE

Quarterly sable and azure, a stag rampant argent and a bordure ermine.

89. Ysabel Glyn Dwr: NEW NAME

Ysabell is found (note the double -ll) dated to 1279 in "Feminine Given Names in A Dictionary of English Surnames, Part Three: The Names H-Z," Talan Gwynek ( http://www.sca.org/heraldry/laurel/reaneyHZ.html ), s.n. Isabel. However, with period of forms of the single -l Isabel and Isobel, this slight change of spelling should be reasonable.

The byname is Welsh (English and Welsh is a non-problematic language combination), dated to 1400, meaning "the glen of the waters of the Dee", in A History of Wales, John Davies (p. 195, Penguin Books, 1990). As Glyndwr was the family name of a Welsh national hero, Owain Glyndwr (c. 1349-1416) , Glyndwr was registered as recently by the CoA as 2005 (and as Glyn Dwr in 2000), so either form seems reasonable.

90. Ysabel Glyn Dwr: NEW DEVICE

Per saltire argent and vert, in pale a tree eradicated proper and a bear statant erect affronty sable.

The bear isn't really hula-ing as placing its limbs so that it demonstrates that it is indeed a bear.

I was assisted in the preparation of this letter by the commentary of Ari Ánson, Aryanhwy merch Catmael, Ástríðr Þórgeirsdóttir, Katherine Throckmorton, Knute Hvitabjörn, Maridonna Benvenuti and Taran the Wayward.

This letter contains 36 new names, 29 new devices, 7 new badges, 4 new name changes, 1 new device change, 4 name resubmission, 6 device resubmissions, 1 badge resubmission, 1 request for reconsideration and 2 tranfers/acceptances. This is a total of 91 items, 77 of them new. A check to cover fees will be sent separately.

Thank you again for your indulgence and patience, your expertise and your willingness to share it.

I remain,

Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy

c/o Linda Miku

2527 East 3rd Street; Tucson AZ 85716

atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com; brickbat@nexiliscom.com

Commonly-Cited References

Black, George F. The Surnames of Scotland.

Gordon, E.V. An Introduction to Old Norse, 2nd edition, Oxford at the Claredon Press, 1957.

Medieval Names Archive. http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/

Ó Corráin, Donnchadh and Fidelma Maguire. Irish Names.

Reaney, P.H. and R. M. Wilson. A Dictionary of English Surnames, 2nd Edition, 1976, reprinted 1979.

Withycombe, E.G., The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd Edition. London, Oxford University Press, 1977.


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