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Kingdom of Atenveldt
Heraldic Submissions Page

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ATENVELDT COLLEGE OF HERALDS 1 October 2010, A.S. XLV
LETTER OF PRESENTATION Kingdom of Atenveldt


Unto Their Royal Majesties Tristan and Damiana; Master Seamus, Aten Principal Herald; the Heralds in the Atenveldt College of Heralds; and to All Whom These Presents Come,

Greetings from Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, Brickbat Herald and Parhelium Herald for the Kingdom of Atenveldt!


This is the October 2010 Atenveldt Letter of Presentation. It precedes the external Letter of Intent that will contain the following submissions that are presented here, asking questions of submitters and local heralds who have worked with them; if these questions are not addressed, the submission may be returned by the Atenveldt College of Heralds. Where there any submissions this month, know that I accept online commentary, in addition to questions pertaining to heraldry and consultation. You can send commentary to me privately at brickbat@nexiliscom.com or join “Atenveldt Submissions Commentary” at Yahoo! Groups ( http://groups.yahoo.com/group/Atenveldt_Submissions_Commentary/ ) and post there. (Any commentary is likely be included in the next month's Letter of Presentation so that all may learn from it, and we can see how additional documentation or comments may have influenced a submission. Please don't be shy!)

Please have commentary to me for those submissions under consideration for the October 2010 Atenveldt Letter of Intent by 10 October 2010. Thanks!


Speaking of submissions: I accept direct-to-Kingdom submissions from heraldic clients; this might not be the most favorable route to take, particularly if a group (like a Barony) has a territorial herald, and everyone can stay more in the “submission loop” if a submission is made in this fashion. However, in some cases, this is the only reasonable and timely way for a submission to be made. Local heralds need to send submissions on in a timely manner as well. If you cannot connect with me at an event (very likely) or attend Heraldry Hut, submissions need to be mailed within a month of a local herald receiving them, unless there is a reason for return at the local level. My address: Linda Miku, 2527 E. 3rd Street, Tucson AZ 85716.


Consultation Table: There will be a Kingdom Heraldic Consultation Table at Kingdom Arts and Sciences Competition in Peoria AZ on Saturday, 2 October. Heralds, old and new, are encouraged to drop by and Help the Cause!

Thanks to Helena de Argentoune for coming out to the Poke, Pillage, Pluck and Plunder even in the Shire of Granholme!


Heraldry Hut: The next Heraldry Hut will be held Friday, 15 October, beginning at 7:30 PM.


Submissions Website: You can send electronic commentary on the most recent internal LoIs through the site, in addition to any questions you might have. Current submission forms (the ONLY forms that can be used) can be found on the site. Please let your local populace know about the site, too: atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com.


College of Arms Actions: Atenveldt registrations and returns made at the May and June 2010 Laurel meetings (February and March (most of the Estrella submissions) 2010 Atenveldt LoIs) are found at the end of this report.


Please consider the following submissions for the October 2010 Atenveldt Letter of Intent:


Cáelinn inghean Catháin (Mons Tonitrus): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Or, two axes crossed in saltire and on a point pointed vert a rapier inverted Or.

Cáelinn is an Irish Gaelic feminine name, undated, found in O Corrain and Maguire, p. 41. inghean is the Gaelic particle for “daughter of” (“Quick and Easy Gaelic Names,” 3rd Edition, Sharon L. Krossa, http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/ ).

Catháin is the genitive form of the Middle Irish Gaelic masculine name Cathán, dated 914 through 1036 (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Cathán,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Cathan.shtml ).


Isabel inghean Alasdair (Mons Tonitrus): NEW NAME AND DEVICE

Argent, a lymphad and on a base engrailed azure a fish argent.

Isabel is a feminine English given name dated to 1284 in Withycombe, The Oxford Dictionary of English Christian Names, 3rd edition, p. 164. inghean is the Gaelic particle for “daughter of” (“Quick and Easy Gaelic Names,” 3rd Edition, Sharon L. Krossa, http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/ ). Alasdair is the genitive form of the Early Modern Irish Gaelic masculine name Alasdar (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Alaxandar, Alaxandair (Alasdrann, Alasdar),” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Alaxandar.shtml ). There is an Early Modern Irish Gaelic form of the given name, as Isibél (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Isibél,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan,

http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Isibel.shtml ), which would fit in very nicely with the patronymic. The client desires a female name, is most interested in the language/culture of the name (Scottish-Gaelic) and wishes it to be authentic for language/culture (Scottish-Gaelic).


Lachlan MacLean (Mons Tonitrus): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Quarterly gules and argent, on a sun counterchanged a fleur-de-lys Or.

Lachlann (double -n) is dated to 1436 as a surname in Black (p. 410 s.n. Lachlan); Lochlan was the heir to Fergus of Galloway a. 1166. While this particular spelling was registered as recently as 2006, in looking through the Armorial, this Lachlan MacLean is in direct conflict with Lachlan MacLean, registered August 2003. Oh. Argh! The client desires a male name, is most interested in the language/culture of the name (Scottish-Gaelic) and wishes it to be authentic for language/culture (Scottish-Gaelic).


Seonaid inghean Mhuireadhaigh (Mons Tonitrus): NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per pale purpure and argent, three towers counterchanged.

Seonaid is a Scottish Gaelic feminine name, a Gaelic borrowing of the Scots name Jonet, with some form used in the 15th C (Academy of Saint Gabriel Report 2120, http://www.panix.com/~gabriel/public-bin/showfinal.cgi/2120.txt , Paragraph 6). Krossa's article, “Scottish Gaelic Given Names for Women: Names of Scottish Gaels from Scottish Gaelic Sources: Seonaid? ( http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/gaelicgiven/women/seonaid.shtml) states "As yet, no pre-1600 Scottish Gaelic examples of the name have been found written in standard Gaelic orthography,” although it appears to be a Modern Scottish Gaelic name. It has been registered as recently as October 2009, to Seonaid Upton.

inghean is the Gaelic particle for “daughter of” (“Quick and Easy Gaelic Names,” 3rd Edition, Sharon L. Krossa, http://www.medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/ ). Muireadhaigh is the genitive form of the Early Modern Irish Gaelic name Muireadhach, dated 1201 and 1257 (“Index of Names in Irish Annals: Muiredach / Muireadhach,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://www.medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/Muiredach.shtml ). The client desires a female name, is most interested in the language/culture of the name (Scottish-Gaelic) and wishes it to be authentic for language/culture (Scottish-Gaelic).


The following submissions appear in the September 2010 Atenveldt Letter of Intent:


Commentary is provided by Aryanhwy merch Catmael [AmC], Bjorn mjoksiglandi [Bm], Helena de Argentoune [HdA], Michael Gerard Curtememoire [MGC] and Marta [MMM].


Alis Fullam (Granholme): NEW NAME

With the English docs or the given name, (and the fact that if you cite the version at http://heraldry.sca.org/laurel/reaneyintro.html it's no-photocopy), I wouldn't bother mentioning the Gaelic documentation at all; the 1200 date for <Alis> in English is good enough. [AmC]


Annábla inghean Dubhghaill (Granholme): NEW NAME and DEVICE: Lozengy Or ermined vert and purpure, a dove volant argent and a chief vert.

The name is correctly formed and I found no conflicts. [AmC]


Atenveldt, Kingdom of: BADGE RESUBMISSION for Order of the Black Chamfron

(Fieldless) A chamfron sable charged with a sun Or.

The name appears in the 20 August 2010 Atenveldt Letter of Intent.

The original badge submission, (Fieldless) A chamfron sable., which also appears in that LoI, is in conflict with a badge registered to the Kingdom of Trimaris, Or, a chamfron sable. There is now two CDs, for field difference and for the addition of a tertiary charge.


Atenveldt, Kingdom of: BADGE RESUBMISSION for Order of the White Stirrup

(Fieldless) A sun Or within and conjoined to a stirrup argent.

The name appears in the 20 August 2010 Atenveldt Letter of Intent.

With the return and subsequent resubmission of the related equestrian badge for the Order of the Black Chamfron, Their Atenveldt Majesties requested that the original badge submission for the White Stirrup ((Fieldless) A stirrup argent.) be withdrawn and one that more closely matches the armory for the Black Chamfron and identifies more strongly with the Kingdom of Atenveldt be submitted in its place.


Clarice Alienora Aldinoch (Tir Ysgithr): NEW DEVICE: Vert, a drop spindle Or between two sewing needles in pile argent.


Dauidh Fullam (Granholme): NEW NAME and DEVICE: Per bend sinister gules and Or, a beaver sejant erect counterchanged.

Correspondence with Rusa al-‘Aliyya, who helped Dauidh develop his submissions replies that “of Fullam” would be acceptable to him; he just wants to be able to use something similar to or the same meaning of David and Fullam, or the historical variant of Fullam. [MMM]

Correspondence with Rusa, who helped Dauidh develop his submissions replies that “of Fullam” would be acceptable to him; he just wants to be able to use something similar to or the same meaning of David and Fullam, or the historical variant of Fullam. [MMM]

Academy of S. Gabriel Report #3123 says: "There were two standard forms of <David> in Irish Gaelic: <Daui/dh> and <Daibhi/dh> (where the slash represents an acute accent over the previous letter.) [2] However, neither <Daui/dh> nor <Daibhi/dh> is pronounced like what you are looking for. <Daui/dh> was pronounced roughly \DOW-ee\ and <Daibhi/dh> was pronounced roughly \DAH-vee\." The footnote is [2] Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (WWW: Academy of S. Gabriel, 2001-2006). http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/mari/AnnalsIndex/ Given this, I believe that there is a sufficient change in pronunciation between the submitted name and the submitter's legal name. [AmC]


Dubhchobhlaigh ingean an Bháird ui Néill (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME

The particle for 'daughter' is misspelled; it should be <inghean>.

The masculine counterpart of the first byname is discussed in Academy of S. Gabriel Report #2332: "<Mac an Bhaird> is also a spelling appropriate to a later period than you want to re-create. This patronymic surname literally means "son of the bard", and it would have been used literally throughout our period. The earliest certain example we've found of that name is <Mael Isu Mac in Baird> in 1137 [2, 3]." [2] Donnchadh O/ Corra/in & Mavis Cournane, "The Annals of Ulster" (WWW: CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork, Ireland, 1997), entry U1173.7. http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100001/ [3]
ATENVELDT COLLEGE OF HERALDS 1 September 2010, A.S. XLV
LETTER OF PRESENTATION Kingdom of Atenveldt


Donnchadh O/ Corra/in & Mavis Cournane, "Annals of the Four Masters", six volumes (WWW: CELT: Corpus of Electronic Texts: a project of University College, Cork, Ireland, 1997-98), entry M1173.5. http://www.ucc.ie/celt/online/G100005C (v.3, M1172-M1372) The example cited from the Annals uses non-standard orthography; the submitted form uses correct standardized orthography (the accent on the <a> is supported by Woulfe, who has <mac an Bha/ird> as a header, noting that the surname is very common, found throughout Ireland, and mentioning three families of that name. [AmC]

Elias Loredan (BoAtenveldt): BADGE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, June 2010: Counter-ermine, on a plate a lion of Saint Mark passant guardant gules, haloed and maintaining beneath its forepaw an open book Or bound gules, a bordure embattled argent.

The name was registered January 2005.

The original submission, Counter-ermine, on a plate a lion of Saint Mark passant guardant gules, haloed Or, maintaining beneath its forepaw an open book argent bound gules, a bordure embattled argent., was returned because the maintained book, one of the attributes of a lion of St. Mark, violates the rule of tincture. “We consider the tincture of the book to be the tincture of the pages, not the tincture of the binding. Maintained charges are allowed to violate the rule of tincture, but must still have some contrast with the background on which it lies. In this case, the argent book has no contrast with the plate, so this device must be returned.” The client has changed the tincture of the pages to Or (which he really prefers), but if absolutely necessary, he will accept a completely-gules book.

Eoin Ó Seachnasaigh (BoAtenveldt): NEW NAME and DEVICE: Sable, a bend sinister vert fimbriated and in dexter chief a Celtic cross argent.


Edward de Foxton (BoAtenveldt): DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, May 2006: Per bend sinister vert and purpure, a bend sinister between a sheaf of three swords and a fox rampant contourny argent.

Please draw the sheaf of swords bigger. You can definitely draw the bend sinister just a bit narrower (and I'm pretty sure slightly higher) if you want to your namesake fox to be a bit bigger, too. And definitely when you produce the thing yourself, you can choose a space that allows the fox more room. But the swords still need to be bigger then. [MGC]

With three types of charges lying on the field, these arms do not qualify for X.2. Nevertheless, I found no conflicts. [AmC]

Grimric of Middlesex (Granholme): NEW NAME and DEVICE: Per pale sable and argent, an eagle and on point pointed Or a gauntlet gules.

This should be clear of David Westerville, Per pale sable and argent, a crane displayed legless Or., with two Clear Differences for the addition of a charged base. There might be a CD for the difference in body type between a raptor/eagle and a wading bird/crane, although the characteristic long legs of the crane are missing. [MMM]


Günter Haller (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME

If Günter Haller is interested in the sound of the name exactly as presented in the description, he should drop the umlaut, thus incidentally simplifying the research. U with umlaut is a high rounded back vowel: say EE, keep your lips in place, now say OO with the rest of your mouth. [MGC]

Documentation from Günter Weiss, January 2005: "On the given name the submitter feels that it is a reasonable variant of Günther, noting Socin's Mittelhochdeutsches Namenbuch s.n. Gunterius has Gunterus Spirensis episcopus dated 1151 and Guntherius abbas s. Blasii from 1164. " [Alisoun MacCoul]


Kolos Siklósi (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME

The standard "given name" + "surname" order only occured when the name was rendered in Latin. In Hungarian, the byname precedes the given name. The June 2005 CL discusses this: "Rede Booke and Kolosvari Arpadne Julia argue that while given name + surname

is found in Hungarian names when the name is in a Latin context, and when the given name (although not necessarily the surname) is written in Latin. However, she argues, when the full name is rendered in Hungarian, the order is always reversed." Unfortunately, changing the order of the elements, reversing the name to <Siklósi Kolos> so that it is properly constructed in Hungarian, is a major change, which he doesn't allow. Perhaps the submitter can be contacted to see if he allows such a change? [AmC] I emailed Erik (the client), and he said that change would be fine. [Bm]

Marek the Jew (Twin Moons): CHANGE OF DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, May 2010: Argent, a Star of David sable and a bordure embattled per saltire sable and gules.

The name was registered March 2005.

The previous change of device, Argent, a Star of David gules and a bordure embattled per saltire sable and gules., was returned by Laurel for “

violating our ban on symbols of the International Red Cross. The Israeli national aid society, Magen David Adom ("Red Star of David"), is a member of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and uses a gules Star of David on an argent field within the country of Israel. At this time, we are adding to the list of restricted charges "a single gules Star of David on any argent background or in any way that could be displayed on an argent background.”” The client has changed the tincture of the Star of David.


Maria Kirsten Matz (Barony of Atenveldt): NEW NAME and DEVICE” Purpure, a great sword inverted bendwise sinister between two roundels Or, each charged with a penguin statant proper.

Whoo! I love to see people using this style of name construction. I note that no documentation was provided for the spelling <Kirsten>. It is dated to 1332-50 in Talan Gwynek, "Medieval German Given Names from Silesia" (http://www.s-gabriel.org/names/talan/bahlow/).

I do not have anything to support reversing the order of the given names. The use of <Maria> as a devotional name among men did not develop until after our period to the best of my knowledge. [AmC] I have contacted the client. Not specifying the gender of the name is fine with her in the event that someone might be able to ferret out an example of a period devotional name for a man. Thanks for the Kirsten documentation. [MMM]


Ponar'ia Apoloseva (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME and DEVICE: Vert, two rabbits combattant and in base three cinquefoils two and one all argent.


Roana le Broc (Wealhhnutu): DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, May 2010: Per bend sinister vert and sable, a badger's head cabossed argent marked sable and an oak sprig inverted argent.

The name was registered May 2010.

The previous submission, Per pale vert and sable, in pale a badger's head cabossed argent marked sable and an oak sprig inverted argent., was returned for using sable markings on the badger's heads against a sable field. Placing the badger's head on vert provides a little better contrast with the sable markings, helping with the identifiability of the charge.


Rose Ella Duvanovicha doch' Sychevna (Brymstone): NEW DEVICE: Per pale argent and sable, two harpies close addorsed counterchanged.

I'd like to propose having the harpies one above the other, to much better fill the space--as well as being way more recognizable even as

currently drawn. But failing that, or even with that, their heads need to be larger compared to their bodies and their breasts bigger and fuller (remember the civic-heraldry mermaid?)--and nipples wouldn't hurt. Because at present, from any distance at all these look like badly drawn songbirds, and that cannot be the submitter's intention. [MGC]


Rusa al-‘Aliyya (Granholme): NEW NAME and DEVICE: Azure, on a pale barry sable and Or between four goblets Or a lotus blossom in profile argent.


Thomas Cyriak Bonaventure (Granholme): DEVICE RESUBMISSION from Laurel, June 2009: Gules, three roundels Or conjoined each charged with a broad arrow points outward sable, a bordure Or.

The name was registered March 2008.

The previous submission, Gules, two chevronels between a mullet of eight points and a cannon mounted in a ship's carriage, a bordure Or., was returned for conflict. This is a complete redesign.


Titus Acilius Crassus (Granholme): NEW NAME and DEVICE: Per bend sinister sable and vert, a natural leopard Or marked sable sustaining a halberd, a bordure argent.


Varga János (Twin Moons): NEW NAME

Great name! I found no conflicts. [AmC]


Viola de Maupin (Tir Ysgithr): NEW NAME


The following submissions are returned by the Atenveldt College of Heralds, September 2010


Varga János: NEW DEVICE: Azure, a wolf sejant erect affronty argent maintaining in his dexter paw a lantern Or and sustaining in his sinister paw a spear Or, tipped sable, upon a trimount vert.

Does Varga János need to document the vert mount against the azure field as very Hungarian and thus acceptable? [MGC]

I would say "yes." The COA may "know" that this is Hungarian style heraldry, but it still violates "our" Rule of Tincture. In order to qualify for a "regional style exception" the submitter still needs to document "azure a trimount vert" as being pre-17th C. Heraldic style for <some region>. We can, of course, do that for them, but either way, the docs should still be submitted to Laurel. [HdA]

Well, it would've been cool if this had been documented at the Pennsic Consultation Table :) However, the use of vert trimounts upon azure fields was permitted in the November 1993 LoAR:

“Probably the biggest single issue considered at this Laurel meeting was the appeal of Ördög Magyar Béla, Azure, a demi-wolf contourny argent, issuant from a trimount vert, holding in its mouth a vol Or. While this usage clearly violates the strictures of RfS VIII.2.b.i. ("The field must have good contrast with every charge placed directly on it and with charged placed overall."), as with its earlier submission, it "engendered no little discussion" and was the most discussed issue in the commentary (four and a half pages in 10 point type, in addition to the evidence submitted in the appeal itself).

The evidence submitted with this appeal goes beyond the bounds of "regional style". Of the forty-eight pieces of armory cited to support this submission, three were from Austria, one from England, twenty-five from the Holy Roman Empire, twelve from Hungary, five from Italy, and two from Portugal. Clearly, then, we are discussing a practice which surpasses the bounds of a single "regional" style.

It was noted that the Rule of Contrast, as codified in VIII.2.b. of the Rules for Submissions, is one of our most inviolate, and that exceptions should only be made to it with due and extremely careful consideration. On the other hand, it is equally true that the Rule of Contrast is our rule, and that just as we chose to adopt it we are equally free to chose to allow exceptions to it, under circumstances of our choosing.

In this case, I believe that the evidence presented adequately demonstrates through multiple period examples that vert trimounts were used on azure fields across Europe. As a consequence, and as you will note in the attached LoAR, we are registering the device proposal of Ördög Magyar Béla.

The next question, of course, is that having now made one exception to the Rule of Contrast, what are the standards for future possible exceptions? I believe the standards proposed by Master Bruce in his thoughts on this submission are the ones to be applied to submissions requesting an exception to any of our Rules in the future.

    'The documentation must consist of multiple examples, not two or three but at least a dozen, and not limited to a single heraldic regime, but be from across Europe. The examples must be of the exact form used in the submission: if the submitter wants a green trimount on blue, that's what must be documented -- and that documentation cannot then be used as an argument for, say, a green fess on blue. The examples must be of comparable simplicity and style as the submission. And finally, even if the evidence is accepted, it only applies to the item at hand.'

In other words, any future submission requesting an exception to any of the Rules for Submission must be documented (1) by multiple period examples, (2) from a number of heraldic jurisdictions, (3) in the exact form of the proposed armory, (4) of comparable simplicity and style as the proposed armory, (5) which apply only to that submission. We do not believe these restrictions to be too onerous, and hope that, if anything, they will stimulate our submitters to do some research on their own.”

This does seem to be a moot point however, since this appears to conflict with Wolfangus MhicMarighdhin, Azure, a wolf sejant erect affronty, forepaws spread in fess, argent, maintaining a basket-hilted broadsword and a targe Or. There is 1 CD for the addition of the mount. There are no CDs given for maintained charges. [MMM]

RETURNED for conflict.

The following submissions were registered by the S.C.A. College of Arms at its May 2010 meetings:


Ariadne of Alyson-tara. Reblazon of device. Sable, a tree blasted sable fimbriated argent.

Blazoned when registered in July 1979 as Sable, a blasted tree voided argent, the reality is that the argent portion is merely a thin outline of a tree, the body of the tree being sable.

Cynewyn aux Deux Chevaux. Name and device. Azure, two horse's heads erased addorsed and conjoined and a chief triangular argent.

Submitted as Cynewyn__Deux Chevaux, Deux Chevaux is a plausible sign name in French, perhaps as early as the late 13th C. However, in cases where such names are used as bynames, they include aux 'at the'. We have made this change in order to register this name.

Combining an Old English given name with a French byname is a step from period practice.

Fiordalisa Elena di Tommaso. Name and device. Per bend sinister gules ermined argent and azure ermined argent, on a bend sinister argent four butterflies alternating azure and gules.

Nest verch Rodri ap Madyn. Device change. Argent, a mullet voided and interlaced within and conjoined to an annulet, on a chief vert two open books Or.

Her current device, Azure, a sagittary passant and on a chief argent three crescents azure, is released.

Roana le Broc. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Santiago Ramirez de Calatrava. Device. Lozengy vert and Or, a panther rampant argent spotted of divers tinctures incensed azure and maintaining a Latin cross fitchy gules.

Blazoned on the Letter of Intent as 'sustained', the cross does not meet current standards for long, narrow sustained charges: the longest axis of the narrow charge must be at least as long as the long axis of the creature holding it. This cross is, therefore, maintained. We note that it was blazoned as such on the form. Since it is maintained, it does not count for difference. Therefore, we must consider the device of Caitilin Irruis inghean ui Riada, Per pale vert and purpure, a panther rampant guardant argent, incensed Or, spotted vert and purpure, which appears on Atlantia's February 25 Letter of Intent. The two devices are in conflict, with a single CD for the changes to the field. Both Santiago and Caitilin are members. Therefore, since Atenveldt's letter was issued on February 23, earlier than Atlantia's, we are registering Santiago's device.

The following submissions were returned by the College of Arms for further work, May 2010:


Marek the Jew. Device. Argent, a Star of David gules and a bordure embattled per saltire sable and gules.

This device is returned for violating our ban on symbols of the International Red Cross. The Israeli national aid society, Magen David Adom ("Red Star of David"), is a member of the International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies, and uses a gules Star of David on an argent field within the country of Israel. At this time, we are adding to the list of restricted charges "a single gules Star of David on any argent background or in any way that could be displayed on an argent background."

[This return set a Precedent for the College of Arms: Magen David Adom. Restricted charge. A single gules Star of David on any argent background or in any way that could be displayed on an argent background (such as a fieldless badge).

The protection afforded the symbol of the Magen David Adom by international treaty and by national laws is at a much higher level than simple copyright or trademark. By treaty, the symbol of the Magen David Adom has the same protection as the symbols of the Red Cross, of the Red Crescent, and of the Red Crystal. We believe that the symbol of the Magen David Adom should be protected to the same extent as the symbols of the Red Cross, the Red Crescent, and the Red Crystal are protected. Thus, at this time, we are adding to the list of restricted charges the Magen David Adom, "A single gules Star of David on any argent background or in any way that could be displayed on an argent background (such as a fieldless badge)". The use of multiple gules Stars of David may be returned on a case-by-case basis if their placement or usage appears too evocative of the symbol of the Magen David Adom.]

Roana le Broc. Device. Per pale vert and sable, in pale a badger's head cabossed argent marked sable and an oak sprig inverted argent.

This device is returned for using sable markings on the badger's head against a sable field. Precedent says: [Argent, a badger statant sable marked argent, a base gules.] The argent markings on the badger create identifiability problems against the argent field. As precedent indicates, returning Per chevron inverted argent and azure, an Orca embowed sable marked argent and three double-bitted axes argent, "The argent portions of the orca cannot be placed on an argent field" [Rowen Seer, 03/00, R-Caid]. This case is similar, especially since so much of the badger's face is argent. [Meurug Taylor, 03/05, R-Ealdormere]

The problem here is identical: the markings have no contrast with the field, hampering identifiability of the charge.

The following submissions have been registered by the S.C.A. College of Arms, June 2010:

Alexander snarfari. Name and device. Sable, a pale vert fimbriated Or, overall a pithon displayed argent.

Alexander is the submitter's legal name; therefore, we do not need to consider whether this spelling is compatible with the Old Norse snarfari.

al-Yasamin bint Malik. Device. Per fess argent and azure, a domestic cat sejant purpure winged vert and a quadrant Or.

Anabel de Chesehelme. Device. Azure, three sunflowers Or slipped and leaved vert, a chief vair.

Angus MacGreggor MacLeod. Name change from holding name Angus of Atenveldt.

Anne of Stratford. Name.

Submitted as Anne Black of Stratford, the Letter of Intent said that the submitter would prefer the name Anne of Stratford, but was concerned that name would conflict with Anne Hathaway, the wife of William Shakespeare. As no evidence was found that Shakespeare's wife was known as Anne of Stratford, Anne of Stratford does not conflict with her name. The submitter confirmed that she would prefer the name Anne of Stratford; we have made that change.

Annora O Shanan. Household name House of the Scythe and badge. (Fieldless) Two scythes in saltire gules surmounted by a death's head argent.

Submitted as House of the Crimson Scythe, the color term crimson is problematic within a household name.

In May 2009, Laurel ruled: These examples show that it was not any color term that was used in medieval order names, but just the single, ordinary color term. On the basis of period usage, we are upholding the stricter reading of the August 2005 Cover Letter, which is in keeping with the examples of period order names that we currently have. Order names which follow the <color> + <charge> pattern must use the ordinary color term for a heraldic tincture appropriate for the language of the order name.

The same pattern is true for inn-sign names. No evidence was presented, nor was any evidence found by commenters, that crimson or similar color terms were found in inn-sign names. All examples of inn-sign names and other sign names use basic color words like black, red and white. Therefore, we have dropped the problematic element; this would also be registerable as House of the Red Scythe.

Arianna di Pergula della Rosa. Name change from Adriana Kavanaugh and device. Vert, a lit candle ensconced within an orle of ivy argent.

Submitted as Arìanna della Ròsa di Pèrgola, the accents in Italian name books are editorial pronunciation notes rather than part of the name. We have removed them. The submitter's documentation gives Pergola as a modern name, and dates this spelling to the 18th century. The same source gives the 13th century form Pergula, used as a feminine given name. We have changed the byname to match the documented form. The order of the bynames must also be adjusted, as examples of period Italian names show matronymic (and patronymic) bynames before locative bynames rather than after them. Arianna is found as a literary name in Il Petrarcha in 1574. Its use as the name of an important character who is a normal human being makes it eligible for the literary name allowance. Therefore, Arianna is registerable as an Italian given name. Her previous name, Adriana Kavanaugh, is retained as an alternate name.

Asgod Northman. Name and device. Per fess argent and vert, two ravens volant sable and two dogs courant argent, two and two.

While the spelling Asgod was not clearly dated as a Middle English name, other spellings of the given name, such as Asgot and Osgod, are found in the Domesday Book. Asgod seems a reasonable interpolation. Thus Asgod is a Middle English name, compatible with the Middle English Northman. Blazoned on the LoI as wolves, the beasts in base lack the bushy tails of heraldic wolves so we have blazoned them as dogs.

Bran FitzRobert. Name.

Clariandra Godale. Name.

Nice 13th century English name!

Cordelia MacNaught. Name.

Danielle l'Anglaise de Calais. Name.

Anglois appears to be the more common form of this name in period; that is the form found as a family name in the Paris censuses of 1292, 1421, and 1423, as well as in the 1606 dictionary Thresor de la langue Françoyse. But Anglais is dated in the Middle English Dictionary, which is sufficient to register the submitted form. Danielle is the client's legal given name.

Davin ap Einion. Device. Purpure, in pall an eye argent irised sable between three arrows points outward Or, a bordure argent semy of Latin crosses sable.

Dawn Silverrose. Name.

Dawn is the submitter's legal given name. The submitter requested authenticity for 13th century England. Unfortunately, we were unable to meet this request. Dawn is documented only as her legal name. The byname is registerable as an inn-sign name, but again is not likely to have been used as early as the 13th century.

Duncan Silverwolf McTyre. Device. Per fess azure and vert, a wolf's head cabossed argent within an orle of oak leaves stems outwards Or.

Eilionora inghean Daibhídh mhic Con Mhara. Name change from Els Wolffleinin and badge. Argent, three escallops one and two vert.

Her previous name, Els Wolffleinin, is retained as an alternate name. Nice badge!

Eleanor Peregrine. Name change from Alianora Sweetlove and device. Per pale vert and purpure, in pale a wand bendwise inverted and a cup Or.

Her old name, Alianora Sweetlove, is released.

Els Singer. Name and device. Argent, in pale two arrows in saltire sable and a bottle gules.

This device is clear of the device of Mario l'Arciere, Argent, in saltire two arrows inverted sable, overall a sea-lion erect vert. There is a CD for the removal of the overall sea-lion and a CD for the addition of the bottle in base.

Emm Swan. Name and badge. (Fieldless) A swan's head erased sable.

This badge is clear of the device of Holtmar of Wyrhtenatun, Barry of eight and per pale Or and gules, an eagle's head erased sable. There is a CD for the fieldless design and a CD between a swan's head, with its prominent neck, and an eagle's head.

Emma Attwyll. Name and device. Per bend argent and vert, a horse passant contourny sable, on a chief azure three triquetras argent.

Nice name!

Fíne ingen huí Chatháin. Name.

Finnian MacBride. Name.

The Letter of Intent did not give dates for the submitted spelling of the byname. Pelican Emeritus found dated forms: The Exchequer Rolls of Scotland, vol XXI a.d. 1580-1588, edited by George Powell McNeill, p 491 in an entry dated 1581, lists a "Colinum Makbryde". Registrum secreti sigilli regum Scotorum, by Matthew Livingstone Scotland, p 511 in an entry for 1526, lists "Gilbert MakBryde." The names do not appear to be modernized; the submitted form is a reasonable variant, as both c/k and i/y are used interchangeably in Scots. The given name is justified as the Anglicized form of the name of a Gaelic saint. While it is the modern Anglicized form, it is not found as an Anglicized form before 1600. However, Finnian is also the Early Modern Gaelic form of the saint's name (found for example in the Martyrology of Gorman) and is registerable. This name mixes a Gaelic given name and a Scots byname, which is a step from period practice.

Gareth Raynes. Name.

Hugo Harp. Name.

Josep Mülich. Name and device. Argent, a Cornish chough rising proper between three crosses formy, a bordure vert.

The submitter requested authenticity for a not clearly specified language and culture. This name is authentic for 13th-15th century German.

Juliana Carlyle. Name and device. Per pale sable and azure, a fox dormant and on a chief triangular argent a thistle vert headed purpure.

Nice name! Blazoned on the LoI as having a per pall field, the central point does not reach the horizontal tick-marks on the field, but is substantially above that point, and the fox crosses above the per-fess line. Commenters checked for conflict as a chief triangular, so it does not need to be pended for further checking.

Katerina Kristoff. Badge. (Fieldless) A feather fesswise purpure.

Commenters were slightly mixed on whether this was a feather or a leaf. Those at the Wreath meeting overwhelmingly identified it as a feather. Please instruct the submitter to draw the feather longer, so it appears less like a leaf.

Kedivor Tal ap Cadugon. Badge. Barry vert and Or, a mullet sable.

This badge is in conflict with the badge of Eleanor Leonard, (Tinctureless) A mullet of four points distilling a goutte. Eleanor has supplied a Blanket Letter of Permission to Conflict that requires that "the primary charge and/or the field must use a divided field, a field treatment, or a fur." Since the submitted armory has a barry field, it meets the terms of the letter, and we can accept this badge.

Laila al-Akhyaliya. Name change from Martha Brockbank.

Submitted as Laila al-Akhyaliyah, precedent requires that a name be transliterated from another alphabet (like the Arabic one) using a single transliteration system. In this submission, the final sound of both the given name and byname use the same letter in Arabic and should be spelled in the same way. We have changed the byname spelling to match the given name spelling; it could also be registered as Lailah al-Akhyaliyah. Her previously registered name, Martha Brockbank, is retained as an alternate name.

Lochlainn mac Muiredaigh. Name and device. Vert, a chevron inverted and in chief two roundels argent.

Máel Dúin in Scéith. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Submitted as Máel-dúin_Sceith Gorm, there were several issues with this name. The given name Máel-dúin was documented from Tangwystyl verch Morgant Glasvryn's "100 Most Popular Men's Names in Early Medieval Ireland". In her introduction, the author states, "The use of hyphens in names like máel-dúin is a modern editorial convention and does not represent historic practice." Additionally, historical examples of the name (including those in Tangwystyl's source for the article) have both parts capitalized. Therefore, we have removed the hyphen from the name and capitalized the second portion, following period examples of this name.

The byname Sceith Gorm was intended to mean 'blue shield' and was submitted based on the period bynames in Scéith Girr '[of] the Short Shield' and Gorm 'Blue'. No evidence was submitted and none was found to support the combination of an item and a color in a descriptive byname in Gaelic in our period. Lacking such evidence, the byname Sceith Gorm 'Blue Shield' is not registerable. In addition, the constructed form Sceith Gorm is not grammatically correct. This hypothetical byname falls into the class of "item" bynames. "Item" bynames express the idea that person is associated with an item, and describe them in a way we today might translate as "of the X." Grammatically, these require a noun in the genitive case preceded by in (later an) meaning 'the'. Additionally, any modifying word, such as Girr in the cited example in Scéith Girr, takes the genitive case and is lenited or not depending on several factors. (Gerr is the nominative form corresponding to Girr.) Therefore, were evidence found to support combining a color and an item in a Gaelic descriptive byname in period, this byname would be expected to take a form such as in Scéith Guirm.

Also, Gaelic names are registerable with the accents included or omitted, so long as the use or omission is consistent. In this case, the accents were included in the given name but not the byname. Based on these issues, the closest registerable byname to the submitted form is in Scéith_'of the Shield'. As the submitter allows all changes, we have changed the byname to this form in order to register the name.

Máire Grame of Lewis. Name.

This name mixes Gaelic and Scots, which is a step from period practice. A fully Scots form of the name would be Marie Grame of Lewis or Mary Grame of Lewis.

Michael de Ver. Name.

Nice name!

Michaelis Erasmus. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Submitted as Michaelis Maximus Erasmus, this name mixes elements typical of a Latinized Renaissance name with an element, Maximus, that could only be found in a Classical or Byzantine Roman name. Michaelis Erasmus is a lovely Latinized Dutch name. Without evidence that Maximus might have been used in a time and place compatible with the late medieval or Renaissance Erasmus, it cannot be registered as part of this name. Therefore, we have dropped that element. Michaelis Maximus would alternately be registerable as a Byzantine name.

Morgan MacDuff. Badge. Sable, in fess a death's head enflamed in chief between and conjoined to a pair of hands inverted, a base rayonny argent.

Moricius Rosamon. Name and badge. (Fieldless) Three triangles one and two conjoined gules, azure and vert.

Submitted as Moricius de Rosamon, the submitter documented the byname without the preposition, but requested the addition of de "as a Norman affectation." This reflects a misunderstanding of how Normans used de; it is a normal preposition, meaning "of." It was used as part of locative bynames that described where someone (or their family) was from. The College could find no evidence that the Normans or any other people of the British Isles added de before a patronymic byname, such as this one. Thus, we were forced to drop the preposition to register the name

Nestor Cameron. Name and device. Sable, on a bend sinister indented gules fimbriated Or between a feather bendwise sinister and a crescent bendwise a rose slipped and leaved argent.

Nestor was documented as an Orthodox saint's name or a Russian given name, while Cameron was documented as a Scots byname. This created a serious problem, as Scots cannot be combined with any of the languages for which Nestor was documented. Noire Licorne was able to find a 1587 baptism of a child named Nestor in England. Therefore the name can be registered as a English-Scots mix.

Nycaise D'Ozier la tailleresse. Name and device. Purpure, two horses combatant argent sustaining between them a needle Or.

Submitted as Nycaise Dozier la tailleresse, the Letter of Intent documented Dozier only as a modern name. Commenters were able to find a 1620 citation in the title Genealogie de l'ancienne et illvstre Maison de Creqvy. Dressée et disposée en ceste sorte par Pierre D'Ozier. Therefore, we have changed the spelling of the byname to the dated form in order to register the name.

Otto Langhorn von Baden. Badge. (Fieldless) A castle azure enflamed proper within and conjoined to an annulet sable.

Padraig O'Laughlin. Name and device. Gules, in fess two swords and on a chief Or a crescent azure.

This name mixes Gaelic and Anglicized Irish forms. A completely Gaelic form would be Padraig Ó Lachlainn while a completely Anglicized form would be Patrick O'Laughlin. While commenters could not find O'Laughlin as a pre-1600 spelling, Pelican Emeritus was able to find an early 17th century M'Laughlin, which makes the submitted form plausible as well. Please inform the submitter that the swords and crescents should not touch the edges of the areas on which they are placed.

Róka Sándor. Name and device. Per pale vert and sable, a fox's mask bendwise argent.

Please inform the submitter that this lovely Hungarian name would most frequently have been written without the accents before 1600.

Seraphina Jameson. Name.

This name combines a Latinized Italian given name with a byname which could be Scots or English; either combination is a step from period practice.

Sergei Rostov. Name (see RETURNS for device).

The submitter requested authenticity for 9th to 11th century Russia. As Sergei is not found until the 15th century, we cannot meet this request for authenticity. The byname is an unmodified placename; while these are used as locative bynames in some languages, precedent says that they may not be registered in Russian. Sofya la Rus presented evidence for the use of unmodified placenames in Russian personal names. However, it is not clear how they were used. Some are clearly used as given names; others are ambiguous, and may have been used as locative bynames as well as given names. In this case, either a second given name or a byname would be registerable in that location. Thus, this unmodified placename can be registered. The more typical forms for a locative byname in Russian are an adjectival form like Rostovskii or a noun form like Rostovets.

Teresa Fergusson. Name and device. Argent, a bend sinister sable between a domestic cat sejant contourny azure and a brown dog sejant proper.

Teresa was documented on the Letter of Intent as the name of the sixteenth century Spanish saint. However, commenters were able to find Teresa as a sixteenth century English name in unpublished burial records. Please instruct the submitter to draw both the cat and wolf with internal details and with whiskers on the cat. Several commenters wondered whether the charge in chief was a stylized horse due to the squared-off shape of the muzzle.

Þórdís Hrefnudóttir. Name.

Uilliam Makcurrie. Name.

The name was documented as a combination of Gaelic and Scots, which is a step from period practice. However, Uilliam can also be justified as a Scots spelling of William. Villiam is found in Aryanhwy merch Catmael's "Index of Scots names found in Dictionary of the Older Scottish Tongue." Uilliam is a reasonable variant spelling, given the interchangeability of u and v in other Scots names.

Varr Ívarsson. Name.

Vasilisa Dragomirova. Name and device. Quarterly sable and argent, a comet bendwise sinister azure between two increscents argent.

Violet Elliott. Device. Argent, a bee volant bendwise wings addorsed sable banded Or maintaining a violet, a bordure purpure.

Vlrich Frank Singer. Name (see RETURNS for device).

Wilhelm Jeger. Name and device. Per pale indented vert and gules, a dagger argent and a sheaf of five stalks of wheat Or.

Wilhelm Jeger. Badge. (Fieldless) A wooden bow surmounted by a wooden arrow fesswise reversed proper headed argent flighted vert.

The following submissions have been returned by the College of Arms for further work, June 2010:

Bellatula of Saint Michael in Peril of the Sea. Name.

As submitted, this name has multiple problems. The given name Belatulla (note the differences in spelling) is found as a Latinized form of a classical period Breton given name. No support could be found for the submitted spelling. While the Letter of Intent asserted that this name is dated to the 6th or 7th century, it's the related Beladore that is so dated. The name Belatulla appears to be in use at a somewhat earlier time.

The phrase Saint Michael in Peril of the Sea was documented from the Chanson of Roland, in which Saint Michael is described as seint Michel del Peril. However, there is no evidence that this phrase was used as part of a placename. The location S. Michaelis is dated to 870-882 in Dauzat and Rostaing; it would be registerable. Saint Michael would have to be justified as a possible vernacular version of that name or a later English placename.

The combination of Belatulla and of Saint Michael is two steps from period practice. First, it combines a classical period Breton given name with an English byname (or a Lingua Anglica version of a French byname). Second, it combines two elements that cannot be clearly dated to within 300 years of one another. Thus, it cannot be registered.

If the submitter could demonstrate that the two elements could be dated to within 300 years of one another, this could be registered with a single step from period practice. Alternately, the submitter might want to consider either a placename which is temporally compatible with the given name or a name like the 13th century Latinized English Bella, which could be combined with the byname of Saint Michael. However, the change to a name like Bella of Saint Michael is a greater change than we would make without the explicit authorization of the submitter.

Colm Kile of Lochalsh. Alternate name Belching Tom Tupper of Ware and badge. Per fess sable platy and argent, a three-fingered cubit arm aversant inverted issuant from chief argent and a three-footed covered kettle sable.

This name is obtrusively modern; multiple commenters agreed that the combination of Tupper and of Ware creates an obtrusive reference to the modern commercial product Tupperware. Therefore, it falls afoul of the precedent:

The fact that this is a "joke name" is not, in and of itself, a problem. The College has registered a number of names, perfectly period in formation, that embodied humor: Drew Steele, Miles Long, and John of Somme Whyre spring to mind as examples. They may elicit chuckles (or groans) from the listener, but no more. Intrusively modern names grab the listener by the scruff of the neck and haul him, will he or nill he, back into the 20th Century. A name that, by its very presence, destroys any medieval ambience is not a name we should register. (Porsche Audi, Returned, LoAR 08/92, pg. 28)

Additionally, no evidence was presented nor could any be found that Belching is a reasonable byname, or that bynames like this could be prepended (placed before the given name).

Blazoned on the Letter of Intent as a hand in benediction, such a hand is apaumy with the thumb and first two fingers raised, the others curled in to the palm. The charge in chief is a hand aversant with two fingers and a thumb. Such a hand was returned on the December 2007 LoAR: "This device is returned for lack of documentation of the use of a hand with three fingers as used in this submission." No such documentation was provided with this submission, and none could be found.

On resubmission, the submitter should note that the charge in base, blazoned on the letter of Intent as a cauldron, does not have the rounded shape expected of that charge. The cylindrical, flat-bottomed charge shown in the emblazon is termed a kettle in the SCA, and we have so blazoned it.

Elias Loredan. Badge. Counter-ermine, on a plate a lion of Saint Mark passant guardant gules, haloed Or, maintaining beneath its forepaw an open book argent bound gules, a bordure embattled argent.

This badge is returned because the maintained book, one of the attributes of a lion of St. Mark, violates the rule of tincture. We consider the tincture of the book to be the tincture of the pages, not the tincture of the binding. Maintained charges are allowed to violate the rule of tincture, but must still have some contrast with the background on which it lies. In this case, the argent book has no contrast with the plate, so this device must be returned.

Máel Dúin in Scéith. Device. Azure, a tower between three swords in pall pommels to center argent hilted sable.

This device is returned for conflict with the device of the Canton of Unikankare, Azure, a tower between three laurel wreaths argent. The canton's laurel wreaths are fully-closed wreaths, so there is not a CD for the change of orientation of the secondary charge group. There is a single CD for the change of type of the secondary charge group, from wreaths to swords.

Michaelis Erasmus. Device. Sable vêtu Or, four compass stars in cross argent.

This device is returned for conflict with the device of Gerhard Helmbrecht von Offenbach, Gyronny azure and argent, four compass stars argent. There is a CD for the field, but the position of the compass stars in Gerhard's device is forced.

The device is also returned for conflict with the device of Shirazuki Yoshitaro, Sable, vetu Or, within a torii gate argent a tricune Or. Both must be considered as Or, on a lozenge throughout sable..., and under that blazon, there is a single CD for the multiple changes to the tertiary charge group.

The device is also in conflict with the badge of Isabel Dancere, Sable vetu ployé, a bowen knot crosswise Or. When compared as charged lozenges, there is a single CD for the changes to the tertiary charges.

On resubmission, please inform the submitter that the use of a compass star is a step from period practice.

Sergei Rostov. Device. Quarterly Or and vert, a cross bottony quarterly vert and argent.

This device is returned for conflict with the badge of James Andrew MacAllister, (Fieldless) A cross crosslet fitchy quarterly vert and argent. We consider a cross crosslet and a cross bottony to be equivalent and fitching does not count for difference. There is, therefore, a single CD for comparing a fieldless and a fielded design.

Vlrich Frank Singer. Device. Argent, on a pile inverted throughout gules a rapier Or.

This device is returned for conflict with the badge of Dmitrii Volkovich, (Fieldless) A sword Or. Vlrich's submission could equally well be blazoned Gules chaussé argent, a rapier Or. Compared with that blazon, there is a single CD for the change of field. The device is clear, however, of the device of Astrach yo Zhar-Ptitsa, Gules, in pale a sword issuant from a flame voided Or, reblazoned elsewhere on this letter. There is a CD for the change of field and a CD for the removal of the co-primary flame.



Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy

c/o Linda Miku

2527 East 3rd Street

Tucson AZ 85716

brickbat@nexiliscom.com

atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com


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