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Kingdom of Atenveldt
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ATENVELDT COLLEGE OF HERALDS 25 January 2015, A.S. XLIX
Letter of Intent Kingdom of Atenveldt


Unto Andrewe Laurel; Lillia Pelican; Brunissende Wreath; and the commenting Members of the College of Arms,

Greetings of the New Year from Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy, Brickbat Herald and Parhelium Herald for the Kingdom of Atenveldt!


The Atenveldt College of Heralds requests the consideration and registration of the following names and armory with the College of Arms.

Unless specifically stated, the client will accept any spelling and grammar corrections; all assistance is appreciated.



1. Gráinne an Einigh inghean Uí Mháille: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per pale vert and argent, an olive tree eradicated counterchanged fructed sable, a base rayonny Or.


The name is Irish Gaelic. Submitted as Gráinne Ni Mháille, this is in direct conflict with the female Irish pirate Grace O'Malley (c. 1530-c. 1603): when Grace O'Malley is Googled, the Irish form of her name is almost always included in the entry. Everyone who commented internally saw a conflict with that historical figure, and that as submitted, that name is presumptuous (SENA PN.4.D.1. Non-SCA People Protected from Presumption).

Blue Tyger also noted that this name is also grammatically incorrect and that Ni is used in Anglicized Irish or Scots, not appearing in Gaelic within period.
Gráinne is an Early Modern Irish female given name found in Mari ingen Briain meic Donnchada's "Index of Names in Irish Annals" (http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Grainne.shtml) with Annals dates from 1317 to 1852.
Ó Máille is a header form in Woulfe at p. 594, with several italicized 16th/17th C.. Anglicized Irish forms under it. That is sufficient to give the submitter the benefit of the doubt that the Gaelic header form was used at the same time. Since Ó Máille is the masculine form, it was suggested to use inghean Uí Mháille as the proper feminine form, from “Quick and Easy Gaelic Names," by Sharon Krossa (http://medievalscotland.org/scotnames/quickgaelicbynames/#clanaffiliationbyname).
She and others suggested adding a descriptive byname not associated with the historical Gráinne to clear the conflict. The client was contacted (she thought there might be a problem with the original name) and was very happy to take this advice. And so,
an Einigh, “the hospitable,” is found in “Index of Names in Irish Annals: Descriptive Bynames found in Feminine Names,” Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/DescriptiveBynames.shtml. I doubt the historical Gráinne would've been considered hospitable, at least by her detractors.

The client desires a female name and is most interested in the Irish language/culture.


This is a great olive tree, instantly identifiable. Orle notes that eradicated means that lots of roots are showing, and that a normal tree would have a little root showing above the ground, as seen here. She notes that old olive trees have copious above-ground roots, so that eradicated can be removed from the blazon; as one who has tripped less-than-merrily among such venerable trees in town, I'd have to agree.

2. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW ORDER NAME, Order of the Beauty of Granite Mountain, and NEW BADGE
Per fess indented vert and sable, a quill in inkwell Or and a bordure erminois.

The barony's name submission appears in the 30 December 2014 Atenveldt LoI.


This is the original name submission from the Barony, although the naming format in Juliana's article suggests "Order of [virtue]" without the extraneous "the" -- so this may be more accurate as the Order of Beauty of Granite Mountain. (“Medieval Secular Order Names,” Juliana de Luna, http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/)

Although the spelling Beauty is post-period, the word was known in period. See, e.g., the Middle English Dictionary s.n. beaute. The use of the Lingua Anglica term in order names is permitted by SENA.


3. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW ORDER NAME, Order of Finesse of Granite Mountain, and NEW BADGE

Per fess indented vert and sable, a rapier Or and a bordure erminois.


The barony's name submission appears in the 30 December 2014 Atenveldt LoI.


Finesse should be registerable as an abstract quality meaning fineness or a degree of excellence . Middle English Dictionary http://quod.lib.umich.edu/m/med/lookup.html, fīnesse (n.) [From fīn adj.; cp. OF finesse.] (a) Degree of excellence;
(a) (1472-5) RParl. 6.155b: The Kyng is gretely deceyved..in the fynesse of such Clothes.


4. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW ORDER NAME, Order of the Fury of Granite Mountain, and NEW BADGE

Per fess indented vert and sable, a Thor's hammer Or and a bordure erminois.


The barony's name submission appears in the 30 December 2014 Atenveldt LoI.

We're not so sure that "Fury" is a "virtue" that period people would be likely to name their awards (“Medieval Secular Order Names,” Juliana de Luna, http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/). However, this can be made registerable with the use of a plausible 16th C. English surname that can be used as a given name. It is found in the Family Search Historical Records:
Roger Fury; Male; Christening; 17 Oct 1555; Barnstaple, Devon, England; Batch: P00574-1 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:V5KJ-5NR); and
George Fury; Male; Christening; 21 Oct 1576; Chilham, Kent, England; Batch: C01991-4 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:NNL2-LQL).
The May 2011 LoAR states that "[a] given name can be used to create an order name (one named after a founder or inspiration)." [Order of Taillefer, 5/2011 LoAR, A-Lochac].
Because Fury is a plausible given name, Order of Fury is an Order named after the founder or inspiration. Order of Fury of Granite Mountain simply adds the branch name as is permitted by SENA. It is likely that the would not be included in the name of the Order, but this is how it was originally submitted by the Barony.


5. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW ORDER NAME, Order of the Golden Heart of Granite Mountain, and NEW BADGE

Per fess indented vert and sable in pale a heart and an ermine spot Or, a bordure erminois.


The barony's name submission appears in the 30 December 2014 Atenveldt LoI.


Per the May 2009 Cover Letter, Golden is one of the color terms usable in Order names. (http://heraldry.sca.org/loar/2009/05/09-05cl.html). The spelling golden is found in period from as early as 1398: "1398 J. Trevisa tr. Bartholomew de Glanville De Proprietatibus Rerum (1495) xvi. iv. 553 A thynne plate of golde of the whyche golden threde is made." Similar <color + charge> orders, Gold(en) Apple, Gold(en) Fleece, Gold(en) Spur and Gold(en) Tree, are found in “Medieval Secular Order Names,” Juliana de Luna, http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/.

Heart, in the OED, dates the meaning as "a figure or representation of the human heart; esp. a conventionalized symmetrical figure formed of two similar curves meeting in a point at one end and a cusp at the other. Also, an object, as a jewel or ornament, in the shape of a heart" to 1463: "The seid broche herte of gold to be hange, naylyd, and festnyd vpon the shryne". The modern spelling heart is used for a stylized figure in 1529 (referring to a playing card).

Adding the Barony name clears conflict with the Order of the Golden Heart, registered to the Barony of Vatavia (August 1983).


6. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW ORDER NAME, Order of the Leaf of Granite Mountain, and NEW BADGE

Per fess indented vert and sable, an oak leaf inverted bendwise sinister Or, a bordure erminois.


The barony's name submission appears in the 30 December 2014 Atenveldt LoI. The spelling leaf is dated to 1640 (well, leafs is) in the COED. Heraldic charges are the most common name elements for period Order names (“Medieval Secular Order Names,” Juliana de Luna, http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/). Adding the Barony name clears conflict with any other SCA group and is permitted in SENA.


7. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW ORDER NAME, Order of the Peregrine of Granite Mountain, and NEW BADGE

Per fess indented vert and sable, a falcon rising, wings elevated and addorsed Or and a bordure erminois.


A peregrine, defined as a sojourner in a foreign land, is dated to 1593 with this spelling; or as a pilgrim or a traveller in a foreign land, is dated to 1570 (both in the COED). A person or a group of people isn't a common Order name, but it can be seen in the Orders of Grail-Templars of Saint George and the Fool (“Medieval Secular Order Names,” Juliana de Luna, http://medievalscotland.org/jes/OrderNames/).


The name of the Barony needs to be included in the Order name to avoid conflict with the Canton of Peregrine (branch-name was registered in May 1983), and Peregrine Pursuivant (heraldic title was registered in January 1982 ).


8. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW ORDER NAME, Order of the Roots of Granite Mountain, and NEW BADGE
Per fess indented vert and sable, a tree eradicated Or and a bordure erminois.


The barony's name submission appears in the 30 December 2014 Atenveldt LoI.

Roots is a 16th C. English surname that can be used as a given name in late period. It is found in the Family Search Historical Records:

Marye Roots; Female; Christening; 08 Nov 1579; Cranbrook, Kent, England; Batch C02159-6 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JS7Q-MMD); and
Elyzabethe Roots; Female; Christening; 04 June 1598; Cranbrook, Kent, England; Batch: C02159-6 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:JS7Q-MTB)
The May 2011 LoAR states that "[a] given name can be used to create an order name (one named after a founder or inspiration)." [Order of Taillefer, 5/2011 LoAR, A-Lochac]. Thus, because Roots is a plausible given name, Order of Roots is an Order named after the founder or inspiration. Order of Roots of Granite Mountain simply adds the branch name as is permitted by SENA.

It's unlikely that the would be included in the name of the Order, but this is how it was originally submitted by the Barony.


9. Granite Mountain, Barony of: NEW BADGE
Per fess indented vert and sable, a vol Or and a bordure erminois.


The barony's name submission appears in the 30 December 2014 Atenveldt LoI.

This is clear of conflict with Brioc Morcannuc: Azure, a vol Or., and Kristrøðr Bjarnarson: Gyronny azure and argent, a vol Or., both with a DC for the field and a DC for the addition of the bordure.


10. Helena Harra Arial: NEW NAME and DEVICE

Per bend sinister azure and gules, a Luna moth Or and a scorpion argent.


The name is Spanish. All elements date between 1589 and 1627.

Helena is a female given name, seen with Helena Abiles Garcia, christened 6 May 1627 (https://familysearch.org/ark:/61903/1:1:FR4V-MHX, Batch C89065-1).

The patronymic Harra is seen with Felipe Martinez Harra https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F5K3-2DQ, C86242-1).

The matronymic Arial is found with Felipa Arial, spouse of Gonzalo Rodriguez, the wedding date 11 Jan 1609 (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F543-SYT, Batch M87106-1).

While SENA Appendix C permits <given name + double byname>, it doesn't address the double byname of a patronymic + matronymic. Several examples of this are found in late period names: Juan Ximenez Albarez, christening date 1637 (https://familysearch.org/pal://MM9.1.1/F5FR-2BS, C89030-1) mother's name Ysabel Albarez; Felipe Martinez Harra, christening date 1589 (https://familysearch.org/pal:/MM9.1.1/F5K3-2DQ, C86242-1), mother's name Maria Harra. I tend to believe that in the case of double bynames, the first is the matronymic, the second the patronymic. It seems in these examples, either Harra or Arial could be considered matronymics or patronymics.

The client desires a female name and does not want Harra changed; other changes are acceptable.


With regard to this New World species of moth: [May 1994 LoAR, A-East] Lasair an Fhraoich. Sable, on a plate a moth sable and on a base argent two branches of heather in saltire proper. 'Submitted as a Luna moth, the earliest citation for a Luna moth is well post-period, dated in 1869. As a consequence, we are registering this as a "moth" and leaving the specific type to artistic license.'


11. Jaku'an Kakujo: NEW BADGE

Sable, a hemp leaf within an annulet argent.


The name was registered December 2014.


The client includes in documentation the period uses of hemp as a fiber and as a medicinal, in addition to its display in the period armory of Teodoro da Vlaperga (d. 1461/2), Barry gules and Or, a plant of hemp vert with flowers argent. (This particular rendering of Teodoro's arms appears to be a modern depiction.) Jaku'an's submission is a good heraldic stylization of the leaves illustrated in Image #4, and this is probably the only representation of a hemp leaf that won't cause people to cry “I'm offended,” or to be considered so close to the High Times stoner flag, as to cause potential problems. In the period form, the offensiveness disappears because it stops looking like a typical modern marijuana leaf.


12. Muireen ben Duibh Dara: NEW NAME AND DEVICE

Vert, a brunette mermaid argent facing and drawing a bow to sinister sable, on a chief argent two sprigs of two acorns proper, slipped and leaved vert.


The name is Irish Gaelic.

Submitted as Muireen, the name is actually Muirenn, a feminine Old Irish Gaelic and Middle Irish Gaelic given name (643-979, "Index of Names in Irish Annals: Muirenn," Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Feminine/Muirenn.shtml). (I contacted the client, and she says that this was a misspelling, that she intends the name to be Muirenn.)

Dub Dara is a masculine Middle Irish name (961-1146) with the genitive Duibh Dara ("Index of Names in Irish Annals: Dub Darach, Dub Dara / Dubh Darach, Dubh Dara, Dubhdara," Mari Elspeth nic Bryan, http://medievalscotland.org/kmo/AnnalsIndex/Masculine/DubDara.shtml); that citation shows the genitive used in collaboration with the patronymic mac).

From the March 2012 LoAR Cover Letter: "In Gaelic, the pre-1200 word meaning "wife" is ben, while the post-1200 word is bean. It is followed by the name of her husband in the genitive (possessive) form. Names have been found using the husband's complete name, his given name, and his byname."

This should be clear of Muirenn ingen Dara, registered August 2000, with the addition of the element Duibh.

The client desires a feminine name; language (Irish Gaelic) and culture (Irish) are most important. She will not accept Major changes to the name.

13. Sibyll Hunter: NEW DEVICE

Erminois, in pale a fox salient gules marked sable, three wolf's teeth issuant from dexter and three wolf's teeth issuant from sinister sable.


The name appears in the 30 November 2014 Atenveldt Letter of Intent.


This style of wolf's teeth was registered to Magnus Wolfhunte, October 2008: Counter-ermine, a fer-a-loup inverted, three wolf's teeth issuant from dexter and three wolf's teeth issuant from sinister argent. (The emblazon appears here: http://oscar.sca.org/index.php?action=145&id=7151.)


There was commentary on the ermine spots overlapped by the wolf's teeth, but that type of semy is permitted, and the wolf's teeth maintain identifiability well.

It was also suggested that the fox would be improved if its head were held up high and that it had a better “salient” in general (head up, forelegs pointed up, hind legs slightly separated); we're sending this up to hear if this is an acceptable rendering of salient, or if a redraw is in order.


14. Unna Hjalmarsdottir: NEW NAME CHANGE AND NEW DEVICE CHANGE, from Francesca Valentina d'Ivrea

Or, on a bend sinister wavy azure between a spangenhelm with nasal and oculars affronty and a drakkar sable a scarpe wavy argent.


The name is Old Norse.

Una/Unna is female given name, found in Old Danish as Una, and in in Old Swedish and OW.Norse as Una, Unna (http://vikinganswerlady.com/ONWomensNames.shtml#u).

Hjálmr is found in OW. Norse as both a male given name and a byname (http://vikinganswerlady.com/ONMensNames.shtml#Hjalm). If a name ends in -r, it will change to -s in forming a patronymic for a daughter: Hjálmsdóttir (Hjalmsdottir can be used, with the diacriticals uniformly dropped.). I don't know if the spelling variation can be documented. It was suggested in internal commentary that the more correct form of the patronymic be Hjalmsdottir.

The client desires a female name and is most interested in the Old Norse language/culture. If registered, the currently-registered name is to be retained as an alternate.


If the new device is registered, the current device, Argent, a violet purpure slipped and leaved vert, a chief embattled gules., should be retained as a badge.

The helmet was originally blazoned as a Viking helmet. It was suggested that this might be a spagenhelm (Michael Gerard Curtememoire), but Orle noted that this is a Gjermundbu helm because of the oculars, and that there is no solid single type of a “Viking helm.” She suggests the above blazon.



I was assisted in the preparation of this Letter of Intent by Alys Mackyntoich, Basil Dragonstrike, Christian Jorgensen af Hilsonger, Gunnvor silfraharr, Magnus von Lübeck, Michael Gerard Curtememoire , Song Zidie and Vettorio Antonello.


There are 3 New Names, 1 New Name Change, 7 New Order Names, 4 New Devices, 1 New Device Change and 9 New Badges. There are a total of 25 new items.


Thank you to those who have provided your great indulgence and patience, your expertise and your willingness to share it thus far, and to those who will do the same as this is presented to the College entire.







Marta as tu Mika-Mysliwy
c/o Linda Miku
2527 East 3rd Street; Tucson AZ 85716
atensubmissions.nexiliscom.com
brickbat@nexiliscom.com










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